Loading…
New American Standard Bible: 1995 Update

Revelation 16

Embed This Verse

Add this verse to your website by copying the code below. Customize

Chapter 16

Six Bowls of Wrath

1 Then I heard a loud voice from athe 1temple, saying to the bseven angels, “Go and cpour out 2on the earth the seven bowls of the wrath of God.”

2 So the first angel went and poured out his bowl 1aon the earth; and it became a loathsome and malignant bsore on the 2people cwho had the mark of the beast and who worshiped his image.

3 The second angel poured out his bowl ainto the sea, and it became blood like that of a dead man; and every living 1thing in the sea died.

4 Then the third angel poured out his bowl into the arivers and the springs of waters; and they bbecame blood.

5 And I heard the angel of the waters saying, “aRighteous are You, bwho are and who were, O cHoly One, because You djudged these things;

6 for they poured out athe blood of saints and prophets, and You have given them bblood to drink. They 1deserve it.”

7 And I heard athe altar saying, “Yes, O bLord God, the Almighty, ctrue and righteous are Your judgments.”

8 The fourth angel poured out his bowl upon athe sun, band it was given to it to scorch men with fire.

9 Men were scorched with 1fierce heat; and they ablasphemed the name of God who has the power over these plagues, and they bdid not repent so as to cgive Him glory.

10 Then the fifth angel poured out his bowl on the athrone of the beast, and his kingdom became bdarkened; and they gnawed their tongues because of pain,

11 and they ablasphemed the bGod of heaven because of their pains and their csores; and they ddid not repent of their deeds.

12 The sixth angel poured out his bowl on the agreat river, the Euphrates; and bits water was dried up, so that cthe way would be prepared for the kings dfrom the 1east.

Armageddon

13 And I saw coming out of the mouth of the adragon and out of the mouth of the bbeast and out of the mouth of the cfalse prophet, three dunclean spirits like efrogs;

14 for they are aspirits of demons, bperforming signs, which go out to the kings of the cwhole 1world, to dgather them together for the war of the egreat day of God, the Almighty.

15 (“Behold, aI am coming like a thief. bBlessed is the one who stays awake and keeps his clothes, cso that he will not walk about naked and men will not see his shame.”)

16 And they agathered them together to the place which bin Hebrew is called 1cHar-Magedon.

Seventh Bowl of Wrath

17 Then the seventh angel poured out his bowl upon athe air, and a bloud voice came out of the 1ctemple from the throne, saying, “dIt is done.”

18 And there were flashes of alightning and sounds and peals of thunder; and there was ba great earthquake, csuch as there had not been since man came to be upon the earth, so great an earthquake was it, and so mighty.

19 aThe great city was split into three parts, and the cities of the 1nations fell. bBabylon the great was cremembered before God, to give her dthe cup of the wine of 2His fierce wrath.

20 And aevery island fled away, and the mountains were not found.

21 And ahuge 1hailstones, about 2one hundred pounds each, * came down from heaven upon men; and men bblasphemed God because of the cplague of the hail, because its plague * was extremely 3severe.

Read More


a
1

Or sanctuary

b
c
2

Lit into

1

Lit into

a
b
2

Gr anthropoi

c
a
1

Lit soul

a
b
a
b
c
d
a
b
1

Lit are worthy

a
b
c
a
b
1

Lit great

a
b
c
a
b
a
b
c
d
a
b
c
d
1

Lit rising of the sun

a
b
c
d
e
a
b
c
1

Lit inhabited earth

d
e
a
b
c
a
b
1

Two early mss read Armageddon

c
a
b
1

Or sanctuary

c
d
a
b
c
a
1

Or Gentiles

b
c
d
2

Lit wrath of His anger

a
a
1

Lit hail

2

Lit the weight of a talent

*

A star (*) is used to mark verbs that are historical presents in the Greek which have been translated with an English past tense in order to conform to modern usage. The translators recognized that in some contexts the present tense seems more unexpected and unjustified to the English reader than a past tense would have been. But Greek authors frequently used the present tense for the sake of heightened vividness, thereby transporting their readers in imagination to the actual scene at the time of occurence. However, the translators felt that it would be wise to change these historical presents to English past tenses.

b
c
3

Lit great