Loading…
Acts 10:9–23

9 On the next day, as they were on their way and approaching the city, aPeter went up on bthe housetop about cthe 1sixth hour to pray.

10 But he became hungry and was desiring to eat; but while they were making preparations, he afell into a trance;

11 and he * saw athe 1sky opened up, and an 2object like a great sheet coming down, lowered by four corners to the ground,

12 and there were in it all kinds of four-footed animals and 1crawling creatures of the earth and birds of the 2air.

13 A voice came to him, “Get up, Peter, 1kill and eat!”

14 But Peter said, “By no means, aLord, for bI have never eaten anything 1unholy and unclean.”

15 Again a voice came to him a second time, “aWhat God has cleansed, no longer consider 1unholy.”

16 This happened three times, and immediately the 1object was taken up into the 2sky.

17 Now while Peter was greatly perplexed in 1mind as to what athe vision which he had seen might be, behold, bthe men who had been sent by Cornelius, having asked directions for Simon’s house, appeared at the gate;

18 and calling out, they were asking whether Simon, who was also called Peter, was staying there.

19 While Peter was reflecting on athe vision, bthe Spirit said to him, “Behold, 1three men are looking for you.

20 “But get up, go downstairs and aaccompany them 1without misgivings, for I have sent them Myself.”

21 Peter went down to the men and said, “Behold, I am the one you are looking for; what is the reason for which you have come?”

22 They said, “Cornelius, a centurion, a righteous and aGod-fearing man well spoken of by the entire nation of the Jews, bwas divinely directed by a choly angel to send for you to come to his house and hear 1da message from you.”

23 So he invited them in and gave them lodging.

Peter at Caesarea

And on the next day he got up and went away with them, and asome of bthe brethren from cJoppa accompanied him.

Read More

a
b
c
1

I.e. noon

a
*

A star (*) is used to mark verbs that are historical presents in the Greek which have been translated with an English past tense in order to conform to modern usage. The translators recognized that in some contexts the present tense seems more unexpected and unjustified to the English reader than a past tense would have been. But Greek authors frequently used the present tense for the sake of heightened vividness, thereby transporting their readers in imagination to the actual scene at the time of occurence. However, the translators felt that it would be wise to change these historical presents to English past tenses.

a
1

Or heaven

2

Or vessel

1

Or reptiles

2

Or heaven

1

Or sacrifice

a
b
1

Or profane; lit common

a
1

Lit make common

1

Or vessel

2

Or heaven

1

Lit himself

a
b
a
b
1

One early ms reads two

a
1

Lit doubting nothing

a
b
c
1

Lit words

d
a
b
c