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Zoar
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The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Zoar
Zoar (צוֹעַר‎, tso'ar; צָעִיר‎, tsa'ir; בֶּלַע‎, bela'). One of five cities of the plain. The city to which Lot escaped during the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah (Gen 19:22, 23). Formerly called Bela (Gen 14:2, 8). Referred to by Isaiah and Jeremiah (Isa 15:5; Jer 48:34).
Bela
Bela (בֶּ֫לַע‎, bela'; צוֹעַר‎, tso'ar; צָעִיר‎, tsa'ir). Also known as Zoar. One of five cities of the plain. Lot took refuge here during the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah (Gen 13:10; Gen 14:2, 8; Gen 19:22–23, 30; Deut 34:3, Isa 15:5). For more information, see this article: Sodom and the Cities of
Zair
Zair (צָעִיר‎, tsa'ir; צוֹעַר‎, tso'ar; בֶּ֫לַע‎, bela'). Also known as Zoar. One of five cities of the plain. The city in which Lot took refuge during the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah (Gen 13:10; 14:2, 8; 19:22–23, 30; Deut 34:3; 2 Kgs 8:21; Isa 15:5; Jer 48:34).
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Zoar (Place)
ZOAR (PLACE) [Heb ṣōʿar (צֹעַר)]. A city marking the southernmost point of the Valley of Jordan (or the Valley of Jericho) in Gen 13:10 and Deut 34:3. According to Gen 14:2, 8 the unnamed “king of Bela, that is, Zoar” was a member of a coalition of five kings which was defeated by Chedorlaomer and
Bela (Place)
BELA (PLACE) [Heb belaʿ (בֶּלַע)]. One of the “five cities of the plain,” identified with Zoar (Gen 14:2, 8). This identification is clearly a later gloss. Zoar (Byzantine Zoara, Arabic aṣ-Ṣughar) is an historical city; however, it is doubtful whether any of the “five cities” (Sodom, Gomorrah, Admah,
Zair (Place)
ZAIR (PLACE) [Heb ṣāʿı̂r (צָעִיר)]. A site at which a clash took place between King Joram of Judah and the Edomites (2 Kgs 8:21). In the parallel account in 2 Chr 21:9, we find instead of the place-name the phrase ʿim śārāyw (i.e., “with his generals”). Already in the reign of Joram’s father, Jehoshaphat,
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Zoar
Zoar. One of the “cities of the plain” confederated with Sodom, Gomorrah, Admah, and Zeboiim (Gn 14:2, 8). Zoar, also known by its earlier name Bela (v 2), is best known as the town which served as a temporary refuge for Lot and his daughters during the destruction of Sodom and the other cities of the
Bela (Place)
Bela (Place). Alternate name for Zoar, a city of the plain, in Genesis 14:2.See Cities of the Valley, Cities of the Plain; Zoar.
Zair
Zair. Place where Joram attacked and defeated the Edomites (2 Kgs 8:21). In the parallel passage of 2 Chronicles 21:9, the phrase “to Zair” is replaced by the phrase “with his commanders” (the Hebrew words are similar). Many have therefore suggested that a copyist revision appeared in 2 Chronicles because
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Zoar
Zoar zōʹär [Heb. ṣōʿar, ṣôʿar—‘little’; Gk. Sēgōr, also Zogor, Zogora]. The only one of the five Cities of the Valley that was not destroyed in the fiery upheaval described in Gen. 19:24–28; the city to which Lot escaped from Sodom (vv 20–23, 30). It was apparently less significant than the
Zair
Zair zāʹēr, zāʹər [Heb. ṣāʿîr—‘little, insignificant’; Gk. Siōr]. A place to which Joram “passed over” with all his chariots when Edom revolted against Judah (2 K. 8:21). It is possibly to be located in Edom, and some have suggested reading “Seir.” There are textual points to consider, however.
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Zoar
ZOAR One of the “cities of the plain” confederate with Sodom, Gomorrah, Admah, and Zeboiim (Gn 14:2, 8). Zoar, also known by its earlier name Bela, is best known as the town that served as a temporary refuge for Lot and his daughters during the destruction of Sodom and the other cities of the plain (19:22–23,
Bela (Place)
BELA* (Place) Alternate name for Zoar, a city of the plain, in Genesis 14:2. See Cities of the Plain; Zoar.
Zair
ZAIR Place where Joram attacked and defeated the Edomites (2 Kgs 8:21). In the parallel passage of 2 Chronicles 21:9, the phrase “to Zair” is replaced by the phrase “with his commanders” (the Hebrew words are similar). Many have therefore suggested that a copyist revision appeared in 2 Chronicles because
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Zoar
Zoar (zoh´ahr), one of the five cities of the Plain (along with Sodom, Gomorrah, Admah, and Zeboiim). Four eastern kings led by Chedorlaomer, king of Elam, defeated these five cities in the valley of Siddim (Gen. 14:1–12). God allowed Lot to flee from Sodom to Zoar before he destroyed Sodom and the other
Zair
Zair (zay´uhr), a location either in or near Edomite territory where Jehoram, the king of Judah (southern kingdom), fought the Edomites in an attempt to keep them under Israelite control (2 Kings 8:21). The location is unknown, although some scholars connect it with Zoar (Deut. 34:3) or Zior (Josh. 15:54);
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Zoar
ZOAR. town also known as Bela, apparently located at the S end of the Dead Sea (Jos Wars iv. 8.4), perhaps near Khirbet esh-Sheik ’Isa. In patriarchal times the environs of Zoar were very attractive (Gen 13:10). It was on the route followed by the five invading kings (Gen 14:5–9). Lot’s intercession
Bela, Belah
BELA, BELAH1. Another name for Zoar (q.v.), one of the five cities of the plain with Sodom and Gomorrah (Gen 14:2, 8).2. A descendant of Esau who is listed as the first king of Edom (Gen 36:32–33; 1 Chr 1:43–44). From the name of his father, Beor, the same name as the father of Balaam, some have thought
Zair
ZAIR. An unknown place near Edom where King Joram met the Edomites in an unsuccessful attempt to crush their revolt against Judah (2 Kgs 8:20 ff.).
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Zair
ZAIR. 2 Ki. 8:21 records that King Joram passed over to Zair to crush a revolt of the Edomites, hence its probable location was on the border of Edom. Some mss of the lxx read here Z (e)ior, and Zair may possibly be identical with *Zior, listed in Jos. 15:54, in the Judaean hill-country.R. A. H. Gunner
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Zoar
Zoar (Heb. ṣōʿar)The southernmost city in the “valley of Jericho” (Deut. 34:3; Gen. 13:10). One of the five “cities of the valley” in a coalition (with Sodom, Gomorrah, Admah, and Zeboiim) that rebelled against King Chedorlaomer of Elam (Gen. 14:2, 8). Because the kings of the other cities are called
Bela (Place)
Bela (Heb. belaʿ) (PLACE)The original name of Zoar, one of the “cities of the valley” of Siddim (Gen. 14:3), probably located on the southeastern bank of the Dead Sea.
Zair
Zair (Heb. ṣāʿɩ̂r)The site of King Joram’s unsuccessful battle to maintain Judean sovereignty over the Edomites (2 Kgs. 8:21). Zair was probably in or near Edom (Seir; cf. Zoar, Gen. 19:20–22); the identification with Zior, a town in the Judean hill country (Josh. 15:54) as suggested by some LXX manuscripts,
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Zoar
Zoar [zōˊər] (Heb. ṣō˓ar, ṣô˓ar “little”). One of the five “cities of the valley” among which Lot chose to dwell (Gen. 13:10–12). The rebellion of Zoar (apparently earlier known as Bela) and the other cities was crushed by Chedorlaomer and his allies at the valley of Siddim (14:1–12).When angels
Bela (Place)
BELA [bēˊlə] (Heb. bela˓ “swallowing up”) (PLACE). The original name of Zoar, one of the “cities of the valley” of Siddim (Gen. 14:3), probably located on the southeastern bank of the Dead Sea.
Zair
Zair [zāˊər] (Heb. ṣā˓îr “small”). The site of King Joram’s unsuccessful battle to maintain Judaean sovereignty over the Edomites (2 Kgs. 8:21). Zair was probably in or near Edom; however, some LXX manuscripts suggest the name is Zior, a town in the Judean hill country (Josh. 15:54).
The Archaeological Encyclopedia of the Holy Land
Zoar
ZOAR The city to which Lot fled from Sodom and Gomorrah (Gen. 19:20–3, 30), whose earliest biblical name was Bela (Gen. 14:8); possibly the same as Suhru, mentioned twice in the El Amarna letters. Zoar is frequently mentioned in the Bible together with the cities of the Valley of Siddim, and the identification
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Zoar
ZOAR A city of the Jordan Valley south of the Dead Sea (Gen 13:10; Deut 34:3). Genesis 14:2, 8 makes reference to the king of Zoar (also called Bela), who joined the alliance of five kings that was defeated by Chedorlaomer and his allies from Mesopotamia. Lot successfully implored the two angels to spare
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