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Wool
Occupational Objects
Dictionaries
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Wool
Wool. Important commodity of the ancient Middle East. Woolen garments were commonly worn by the Israelites (Lv 13:47–59; Is 51:8; Hos 2:5, 9). However, they were prohibited dress for Israelite priests serving in the sanctuary’s inner court (Ez 44:17); woolen garments mingled with linen fabric were forbidden
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Wool
Wool [Heb. ṣemer; Gk. érion]. Wool and linen were the most common fibers woven into cloth for garments (Lev. 13:47f, 59; Prov. 31:13; Hos. 2:5), although any blending of the two was expressly forbidden (Dt. 22:11). The priests were required to wear linen rather than woolen clothing in the inner temple
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Wool
WOOL Important commodity of the ancient Near East. King Mesha of Moab, a sheep breeder, annually sent the wool of 100,000 rams as tribute to King Ahab of Israel (2 Kgs 3:4), and the people of Damascus traded wool with Tyre’s merchants (Ez 27:18). Woolen garments were commonly worn by the Israelites (Lv
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Wool
wool, the fleece of a sheep, used in the ancient Near East for clothing (Lev. 13:47–48; Ezek. 34:3). White wool was one of the principal products traded by Damascus to Tyre (Ezek. 27:18). The wool of a hundred thousand rams had to be paid by Mesha, king of Moab, as tribute to Ahab, king of Israel (2
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Wool
WOOL. The high value set upon wool as the basic fabric for clothing (Jb. 31:20; Pr. 31:13; Ezk. 34:3) is reflected in its inclusion among the first fruits to be offered by the priests (Dt. 18:4) and as an important item in Mesha’s tribute (2 Ki. 3:4). Damascus wool was prized at Tyre market (Ezk. 27:18);
The Archaeological Encyclopedia of the Holy Land
Wool
WOOL (See also weaving) Sheep’s wool was the raw material most commonly used for weaving cloth. When it is mentioned in the Bible the wool of lambs and rams is usually intended (2 Kgs. 3:4). It is also referred to as ‘fleece of sheep’ (Deut. 18:4) and ‘fleece of wool’ (Judg. 6:37). Being white, it became
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Wool
WOOL One of the most common materials for clothing in biblical times (Job 31:20; Prov 31:13; Ezek 34:3). It was used in trade (Ezek 27:18) and for paying tribute (2 Kgs 3:4), and it was often mentioned along with linen. The Law of Moses prohibited wearing cloth made of linen and wool joined together
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Wool
Wool was an article of the highest value among the Jews, as the staple material for the manufacture of clothing. Lev. 13:47; Deut. 22:11; Job 31:20; Prov. 31:13; Ezek. 34:3; Hosea 2:5. The importance of wool is incidentally shown by the notice that Mesha’s tribute was paid in a certain number of rams
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Wool
Woolone of the first material used for making woven cloth (Lev. 13:47, 48, 52, 59; 19:19). The first-fruit of wool was to be offered to the priests (Deut. 18:4). The law prohibiting the wearing of a garment “of divers sorts, as of woollen and linen together” (Deut. 22:11) may, like some other laws of
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Wool
Woolwool, the fleece of a sheep, used in ancient Palestine for clothing (Lev. 13:47–48; Ezek. 34:3). White wool was one of the principal products traded by Damascus to Tyre (Ezek. 27:18). The wool of a hundred thousand rams had to be paid by Mesha, king of Moab, as tribute to Ahab, king of Israel (2
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Wool
WOOL — the thick, soft hair forming the fleece, or coat, of sheep and certain other mammals, valued as a fabric for making cloth (Deut. 22:11; Is. 51:8; Heb. 9:19). Gideon placed a fleece of wool on the threshing floor to receive a sign from the Lord (Judg. 6:37). In a country where snow was seldom seen,
Dictionary of Biblical Imagery
Wool
WoolIn view of the prominence of sheep in biblical societies, the scarcity of scriptural references to wool (fewer than twenty) comes as a surprise. Three main categories can be found among these references.It is obvious, first, that the chief use of wool was to make cloth for garments. In this regard