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Wind
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Whirlwind
Whirlwind (סְעָרָה‎, se'arah). A sign of God’s might or judgment, as well as an object of destruction (2 Kgs 2:1; Job 1:19, 38:1, 40:6; Isa 40:24, 41:16; Zech 9:14).
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Whirlwind
Whirlwind. Term descriptive of any strong, potentially destructive wind (Jb 27:20; Ps 77:18; Dn 11:40). While whirlwinds are relatively common in the arid regions of the Middle East (e.g., dust devils, sand columns), the apparent fury and destructiveness of the biblical “whirlwinds” makes it unlikely
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Wind
Wind [Heb. rû (a)ḥ; Gk. ánemos, also pneúma (Jn. 3:8), pnoḗ (Acts 2:2), pnéousa (Acts 27:40)].
Whirlwind
Whirlwind [Heb. seʿārâ (2 K. 2:1, 11; Job 38:1; 40:6; plural, Zec. 9:14), sûp̱â (Job 27:20; 37:9; Prov. 1:27; Isa. 5:28; 29:6; Jer. 4:13; Am. 1:14; Nah. 1:3; plural, Isa. 21:1; var sûp̱āṯâ, Hos. 8:7), galgal—‘wheel’ (Ps. 77:18 [MT 19]), sāʿar (“come like a whirlwind,” Hab. 3:14; “scatter like
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Whirlwind
WHIRLWIND Term descriptive of any strong, potentially destructive wind (Jb 27:20; Ps 77:18; Dn 11:40). While whirlwinds are relatively common in the arid regions of the Middle East (e.g., dust devils), the apparent fury and destructiveness of the biblical “whirlwinds” makes it unlikely that the relatively
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Winds
winds. In the ancient Near East, winds were an important determinant of weather. In the rainless summer months moisture-laden winds from the Mediterranean (west or northwest) swept over the land during the daytime, moderating the midday heat and leaving a heavy dew at night. These steady winds enabled
Whirlwind
whirlwind, a violent, destructive windstorm, common in Israel during the rainy season. True whirlwinds, i.e., swirling winds or tornadoes, are unusual, though they sometimes do appear near the coast during the early winter. Whirlwinds and storms usually accompanied a theophany, such as God’s appearance
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Winds
WINDS. The Hebrews recognized four horizontal movements of air which they called wind. The S and SE winds crossing the Arabian Desert were hot and dry (Job 37:17; Lk 12:55). The N wind was cooler being favorable to vegetation (Song 4:16). The W, SW. and NW winds brought rain and accompanied a storm (1
Whirlwind
WHIRLWIND. mass of air rotating rapidly round and round toward a more or less vertical axis (Isa 17:13; ASV), and having at the same time progressive motion over the surface of land or sea (2 Kgs 2:11). The violent tornado with its funnel-shaped cloud is not common in Palestine, however. Most biblical
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Wind
WIND (Heb. rûaḥ). 1. The Hebrews conceived of climate as influenced by the four winds from the four corners of the earth (Je. 49:36; Dn. 7:2; Rev. 7:1). The wind may be a source of blessing or a curse, according to its source. Its vast power suggests the wind is the breath of God (Is. 40:7), controlled
Whirlwind
WHIRLWIND. The Eng. translation of Heb. sûp̱â applies loosely to any violent storm and is not restricted to a rotary movement of air (Jb. 37:9; Pr. 1:27; 10:25; Is. 5:28; 17:13; 21:1; 66:15; Je. 4:13; Am. 1:14; Na. 1:3). In av it is translated ‘storm’ in other passages (Jb. 21:18; Ps. 83:15; Is. 29:6).
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Wind
WindThe horizontal movement of air (Heb. rûaḥ; Gk. ánemos). Certain winds were known by reputation, such as the powerful and blighting east wind (Gen. 41:6, 23, 27; Ezek. 19:12). The west wind, generally the prevailing wind in Palestine, moderated the summer heat and brought needed rain (1 Kgs. 18:45).
Whirlwind
WhirlwindLiterally a twisting, swirling wind that leaves destruction in its path. Its predominant use in Scripture is symbolic or metaphoric. The word may be understood in a literal sense (2 Kgs. 2:1; Job 37:9; 38:1; Nah. 1:3), but even among these, the whirlwind is the vehicle of God’s appearance in
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Wind
Wind (Heb. rûaḥ; Gk. pneúma). The horizontal movement of air. The winds came from the four corners of heaven (the limits of the universe, Jer. 49:32, 36; Mark 13:27), sent by God to do his bidding (Gen. 8:1; Exod. 15:10; Ps. 78:26; 135:7; Ezek. 37:9; Rev. 7:1). Although God was not always “in”
Whirlwind
Whirlwind (Heb. galgal, sûp̱â, sa˓ar, se˓ārâ).†A violent windstorm of devastating power. Heb. sǔp̱ǎ, sa˓ar, and se˓ārâ are used of such storms not necessarily with reference to a whirling motion of the air, and are often translated “storm” or “tempest” (but cf. Jer. 23:19; RSV “whirling tempest”).
Dictionary of Deities and Demons in the Bible
Wind-Gods
wind-godsI. In the OT and NT the winds (רוחות‎, πνεύματα, ἄνεμοι) are either ruled as such by God personally (Exod 10:13 and 19; Jer 49:36; 51:1; Hos 13:15; Ps 135:7) or personified as his servants (מלאכים‎, ἄγγελοι: Ps 104:4; Rev 7:1). They are four in number (Jer 49:36; Dan 7:2; Rev 7:1; cf. e.g.
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Winds
Winds. That the Hebrews recognized the existence of four prevailing winds as issuing, broadly speaking, from the four cardinal points, north, south, east, and west, may be inferred from their custom of using the expression “four winds” as equivalent to the “four quarters” of the hemisphere. Ezek. 37:9;
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Winds
WINDS. That the Hebrews recognized the existence of four prevailing winds as issuing, broadly speaking, from the four cardinal points—N, S, E, and W—may be inferred from their custom of using the expression “four winds” as being equivalent to the “four quarters” of the hemisphere (Ezek. 37:9; Dan. 8:8;
Whirlwind
WHIRLWIND. This term is taken from Heb. sûpâ from the root meaning to “snatch away,” signifying a sweeping desolating blast (Hos. 8:7), and să˓ăr, from a root, to toss, indicating the same thing, but more with reference to its vehement agitating motion (2 Kings 2:1, 11). Both words are elsewhere