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Well
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Well
Well (בְּאֵר‎, be'er; φρέαρ, phrear). A deep man-made reservoir dug or drilled in the ground, often walled with stone or plaster. Used to access groundwater.
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Well
Well. Man-made reservoir fed either by subterranean springs or by rainwater. Because the majority of the biblical world ranges from arid to semiarid, wells were a critical source of water for humans, livestock, and the irrigation of crops. Unfortunately, most wells did not offer a reliable source of
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Well
Well [Heb. beʾēr] (e.g., Gen. 16:14; 21:19, 25, 30; 2 S. 17:18, 21; Cant. 4:15); AV also PIT, FOUNTAIN; NEB also SPRING, WATER-HOLE etc.; [bôr] (1 S. 19:22; 2 S. 23:15f.; 1 Ch. 11:17f); NEB also CISTERN; [ʿayin] (Neh. 2:13); NEB SPRING; [maʿyān] (Isa. 12:3); NEB SPRING; [qûr] (“dig wells,” 2 K.
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Well
WELL Man-made reservoir fed either by subterranean springs or by rainwater. Because the majority of the biblical world ranges from arid to semiarid, wells were a critical source of water for humans, livestock, and the irrigation of crops. Unfortunately, most wells did not offer a reliable source of water,
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Well
well (Heb. be’er), a hole or depression dug for the purpose of collecting water. A well was constructed by digging into the ground or by curbing surface springs. Wells, together with cisterns, were the major source of water in the ancient Near East. Digging a well in this semi-arid land was an occasion
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Well
WELL. Wells have always held a prominent place in Bible lands because of the aridity of the land and the scarcity of rainfall. For this reason there are a variety of words used.The most common Heb. word for “well” is b˒ēr (Gen 21:30; Num 21:18; etc.), a source of water made by digging. This root is
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Well
WELL. 1. An artificial shaft sunk to reach underground water, percolating or collected (Heb. be’ēr; Arab. bir; Gk. phrear), whereas a spring (Heb. and Arab. ‘ayin; Gk. pēgē) is the work of nature. av confusion of terminology is due to the same confusion in 17th-century English, reflected also in Milton.
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Well
WellA shaft excavated to collect seepage from a water-bearing stratum beneath the ground (Heb. bĕʾēr, bôr; Gk. pēgḗ, phréar). Unlike a spring, its water is not visible on the surface.The idea of digging for water must have occurred upon observation of springs coming from the ground or from seeing
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Well
Well (Heb. be˒ēr, bôr; Gk. pēgḗ, phreˊar). A source of water, whether a natural surface spring, a shaft sunk to reach a subterranean water supply, or a cistern hewn out and plastered to collect rainwater. In Palestine, where water was scarce, the possession of a water source was extremely important;
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Well
WELL A shaft dug into the earth in order to reach water underground. In arid Palestine, wells were of great importance. The Old Testament is rich with allusions to the importance of wells, cisterns, reservoirs, and other water supplies. Disagreement over wells could lead to violence and fighting (Gen
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Well
Well. Wells in Palestine are usually excavated from the solid limestone rock, sometimes with steps to descend into them. Gen. 24:16. The brims are furnished with a curb or low wall of stone, bearing marks of high antiquity in the furrows worn by the ropes used in drawing water. It was on a curb of this
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Well
WELL. The rendering of the following Heb. and Gk. words:1. Heb. b˒ēr (a “pit”), something dug, and having the meaning of our word cistern (Gen. 16:14; 21:19; 26:19–22, 25; 2 Sam. 17:18; etc.).2. Heb. bôr (from no. 1) is found in 1 Sam. 19:22; 2 Sam. 3:26; 23:15–16; 1 Chron. 11:17–18.3. Heb. ma˓yān
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