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Vulgate
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
The Latin translation of the Bible that Jerome produced in ad 383–405 or that was at least initiated by him, with the Old Testament and Gospels certainly being translated by him.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Vulgate
Vulgate The Latin translation of the Bible that Jerome produced in ad 383–405 or that was at least initiated by him, with the Old Testament and Gospels certainly being translated by him.
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Vulgate
VULGATE. The name Vulgate, indicating a text generally accepted as standard (Latin vulgatus, meaning “common,” or “commonly known”), was not applied to Jerome’s Latin Bible until the Middle Ages. While its title of “Jerome’s Vulgate” is unlikely ever to be abandoned, the most striking result of the past
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Vulgate, the
VULGATE*, THE Latin version of the Bible, commonly identified as the work of Jerome. See Bible, Versions of the (Ancient).
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Vulgate
Vulgate, the authorized Latin version of the Bible. In the late fourth century, Pope Damasus commissioned Jerome to bring order to the existing Latin versions. The resulting translation was called the Vulgate (“common text”). In 1546, the Council of Trent decreed that the Latin Vulgate was to be regarded
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Vulgate
VulgateThe Latin version of the Bible prepared by Jerome (ca. 347–420). In view of proliferating variations in the Old Latin text, Pope Damasus asked Jerome, the outstanding biblical scholar of the day, to prepare a new Latin text, standardizing it by the “true Greek text.” He accepted the assignment
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Vulgate
Vulgate (Lat. vulgata “common”). The Latin version of the Bible prepared by the church father Jerome (ca. 347–420). Although a great number of Latin translations of the Bible (see Old Latin Versions) were available in this period, there was great diversity among them and no one standard edition.
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Vulgate
VULGATE The translation of the Bible into Latin by Saint Jerome (340–420) in the fourth and early fifth centuries. The name “Vulgate” has been given to Jerome’s version since at least the Council of Trent in the sixteenth century; in Jerome’s day, the expression “vulgate edition” referred to the Old
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Vulgate
Vulgate. The Latin version of the Bible (editio vulgata) most widely used in the W. It was for the most part the work of St *Jerome, and its original purpose was to end the great differences of text in the *Old Latin MSS circulating in the latter part of the 4th cent.Jerome began his work, at the
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Vulgate the
Vul´gate, The, the Latin version of the Bible. The influence which it exercised upon western Christianity is scarcely less than that of the LXX upon the Greek churches. Both the Greek and the Latin Vulgate have been long neglected; yet the Vulgate should have a very deep interest for all the western
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Vulgate
VulgateVulgate, the authorized Latin version of the Bible. In the late fourth century, Pope Damasus commissioned Jerome to bring order to the existing Latin versions. The resulting translation was called the Vulgate (‘common text’). See also Texts, Versions, Manuscripts, Editions.
A Catholic Dictionary
Vulgate
vulgate. The name is now commonly given to the Latin version of the Bible, authorised by the Catholic Church. In this version all the books found in the Hebrew Bible were translated by Jerome from the Hebrew and Chaldee originals, except the Psalter, which belongs to an Old Latin version revised by Jerome.
See also
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