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Ucal
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
The recipient of the words of Agur in some translations of Prov 30 (Prov 30:1) along with Ithiel, who is also named. Ithiel and Ucal were probably sons or disciples of Agur, though it is possible that the words are not proper names at all.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Ucal
Ucal (אֻכָל‎, ukhal). The recipient of the words of Agur in some translations of Prov 30 (Prov 30:1) along with Ithiel, who is also named. Ithiel and Ucal were probably sons or disciples of Agur, though it is possible that the words are not proper names at all.
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Ucal (Person)
UCAL (PERSON) [Heb ʾūkāl (אֻכָל)]. One of the recipients of Agur’s utterance, named in Prov 30:1. Nothing else is known of Ucal. He was perhaps a friend or student of Agur along with Ithiel. It is less likely that Ithiel and Ucal are sons of Agur, since they would probably have been designated as such.
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Ucal
Ucal. Disciple of Agur, the wise man whose sayings are recorded in the Book of Proverbs (Prv 30:1). The meaning of the passage is obscure. Many have suggested that the names Ithiel and Ucal are not proper nouns but should be translated, “I have wearied myself for God and fainted.”
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Ithiel and Ucal
Ithiel and Ucal iʹthēəl, oo̅ʹkal [Heb. ʾîṯîʾēl weʾuḵāl] (Prov. 30:1). The names of two persons to whom Agur addressed his words. The text is obscure, however; such an introduction seems strange—nowhere else in Proverbs is the audience named. Although T. Mauch (IDB, s.v. “Ucal”) points to “Surely
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Ucal
UCAL* Disciple of Agur, the wise man whose sayings are recorded in the book of Proverbs (Prv 30:1; see nlt mg). The meaning of the passage is obscure. Many have suggested that the names Ithiel and Ucal are not proper nouns but should be translated, “I am weary and worn out, O God.”
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Ucal
UCAL. According to the usual translation, Ucal is one of the two men to whom the words of Prov 30 are addressed, “The man spake to Ithiel, even unto Ithiel and Ucal” (Prov 30:1). If this is correct, then Ucal may have been a sage known to Agur, who is the author of this chapter. Nothing more is known
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Ucal
Ucal (Heb. ʾuḵāl)If a proper name, one of two people whom Agur addressed in his oracle, perhaps his son or nephew (Prov. 30:1). However, the Hebrew in the verse is obscure and some scholars, as do LXX and Vulg., find not names but an expression such as “I am weary” (NSRV).See Ithiel 2.
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Ucal
Ucal [ūˊKəl] (Heb. ˒uḵāl). If a proper name, one of two people whom Agur addressed in his oracle, perhaps his son or nephew (30:1). However, the Hebrew in the verse is obscure and some scholars, as do LXX and Vulg., find not names but an expression such as “I am faint” (NIV mg.). See Ithiel
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Ucal
UCAL One of the recipients to whom Agur addressed his wisdom (Prov 30:1). Nothing else is known of him.
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Ucal
U´cal (I am strong). According to the received text of Prov. 30:1, Ithiel and Ucal must be regarded as proper names; and if so, they must be the names of disciples or sons of Agur the son of Jakeh, an unknown sage among the Hebrews. But there is great obscurity about the passage. Ewald considers both
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Ucal
U´CAL (ūʹkal; “I am strong” or, possibly, “consumed”). A word that occurs as a proper name in Prov. 30:1: “The man declares to Ithiel, to Ithiel and Ucal.” Most authorities endorse this translation and regard these two persons as disciples of “Agur the son of Jakeh,” a Hebrew teacher, whose authorship
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Ucal
UcalUcal (o̅o̅ʹkal), a word understood by many scholars to be a proper name, the pupil or son of the sage Agur (Prov. 30:1). However, the Hebrew of the verse is obscure and some scholars follow the Greek version (Septuagint) and regard the word as a verb meaning ‘I languish’ or something similar.