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Tigris
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Tigris River
Tigris River (חִדֶּקֶל‎, chiddeqel, Τίγρις, Tigris). Transliterated as Hiddekel in some translations. A river that formed the eastern edge of ancient Mesopotamia. An important water source and transportation waterway.
Seleucia on the Tigris
Seleucia on the Tigris (Σελεύκεια, Seleukeia). First capital of the Seleucid Empire; founded by Seleucus I Nicator in 305 bc on the western bank of the Tigris River, about 50 miles north of Babylon in Mesopotamia.
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Hiddekel (Place)
HIDDEKEL (PLACE) [Heb ḥiddeqel (חִדֶּקֶל)]. The Hebrew name for one of the four branches of the river which flowed out of the Garden of Eden (Gen 2:14). The etymology of the name can be traced as follows: Sum Idiglat, Idigna, Akk Idiqlat, Arab and Aram Diglath, Pers Tigra, Gk Tigris. The only other
Seleucia (Place)
SELEUCIA (PLACE) [Gk Seleukia (Σελευκια); Seleukeia (Σελευκεια)]. A name given to several cities established during the Hellenistic period. These cities are named after Seleucus I Nicator, one of the Diadochi who gained control of a large portion of Alexander the Great’s empire and founded what is known
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Tigris River
Tigris River. One of the two major rivers that drains the Mesopotamian plain. Unlike the Euphrates, it is seldom mentioned in the Bible. In the description of the Garden of Eden, it is listed as the third of the four rivers that flowed out of the river that watered the garden (Gn 2:14, kjv Hiddekel).
Hiddekel
Hiddekel. Hebrew name for the Tigris River (Gn 2:14; Dn 10:4).See Tigris River.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Tigris
Tigris t̄ʹgris [Heb. ḥiddeqel; Gk. Tigris, Tigrēs (Dnl. 10:4) < Old Pers. Tigrâ—‘arrow,’ originally < Sum. idiglat/idigna—‘ever-flowing river,’ through Assyr. i-di-ig-na or i-di-ig-lat]; AV OT HIDDEKEL. The well-known river of eastern Iraq which, together with the Euphrates to the west, enclosed
Hiddekel
Hiddekel hidʹə-kel [Heb. ḥiddeqel; Sum Idiglat, Idigna; Akk. Idiqlat; Old Pers. Tigrâ; postbiblical Aram dîg̱laṯ; cf. modern Turkish Dicle]. The AV rendering in Gen. 2:14 and Dnl. 10:4 for the Tigris River.
Seleucia
3. Seleucia on the Tigris. In 312 b.c. Seleucus Nicator founded this city on the right bank of the Tigris, about 32 km (20 mi) SE of Baghdad at the mouth of the “Royal Canal” that connected the Tigris with the Euphrates, to be his eastern capital. It was built largely with materials brought from Babylon,
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Tigris River
TIGRIS RIVER One of the two major rivers that drains the Mesopotamian plain. Unlike the Euphrates, it is seldom mentioned in the Bible. In the description of the Garden of Eden, it is listed as the third of the four rivers that flowed out of the river that watered the Garden (Gn 2:14). Unfortunately,
Hiddekel
HIDDEKEL* Hebrew name for the Tigris River (Gn 2:14; Dn 10:4, kjv). See Tigris River.
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Tigris River
Tigris (ti´gris) River, one of the two major rivers (the other is the Euphrates) that nourished an extensive floodplain providing the physical basis for the rise of civilization in the ancient Near East. In Gen. 2:14 it is identified as the third river “which flows east of Assyria” running out of Eden.
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Tigris
Tigris River at Baghdad. JRTIGRIS. The Tigris River derives its name from the Gr. Tigris and Old Persian Tigrā. The modern Arabic name is Dijlah, which comes from the original Sumerian name for the river (Idigna), rendered in Assyrian and Babylonian as Idiqlat and by the Heb. ḥiddeqel.The Tigris
Hiddekel
HIDDEKEL. A Heb. rendering of Akkad. Idiqlat, the second major river of Mesopotamia (Gen 2:14; Dan 10:4). The Idiqlat was called Diqlat or Diglat in Aram., Tigrā in Old Persian, and Tigris (q.v.) in Gr.
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Tigris
TIGRIS. The Gk. name for one of the four rivers marking the location of Eden (Hiddekel; Gn. 2:14; Akkad. Diglat; Arab. Dijlah). It rises in the Armenian Mountains and runs SE for 1,900 km via Diarbekr through the Mesopotamian plain to join the river *Euphrates 64 km N of the Persian Gulf, into which
Hiddekel
HIDDEKEL. The ancient name of the river *Tigris used in the account of the Garden of Eden (Gn. 2:14) and in Daniel’s description of his visions (Dn. 10:4) in the 3rd year of Cyrus. The name comes from Akkadian idiqlat, which is equivalent to Sumerian idigna, i.e. always flowing river.Bibliography. D.
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Tigris
Tigris (Gk. Tɩ́gris)The easternmost of the two rivers which give the region of Mesopotamia its name (Gk. mesopotamos, lit., “beween the rivers”). The Tigris (Heb. ḥiddeqel; Akk. idiglat) may have at one time emptied into the Persian Gulf, though today it and the Euphrates share a common mouth for some
Hiddekel
Hiddekel (Heb. ḥiddeqel)The Hebrew name for the Tigris River (so NRSV; Gen. 2:14; Dan. 10:4; Akk. Idiglat; Sum. Idigna).
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Tigris
Tigris [tīˊgrĭs] (Heb. ḥiddeqel; Gk. Tigris; Akk. Idiglat; O. Pers. Tigra).† The easternmost of the two major rivers of Mesopotamia. Formed from two branches that originate on the southern slopes of the Taurus mountains in Turkish Armenia, one south of Lake Geuljik and the other southwest
Hiddekel
Hiddekel [hĭdˊə kĕl] (Heb. ḥiddeqel; Akk. Idiglat; Sum. Idigna). KJV name for the Tigris river (so RSV), following the MT (Gen. 2:14; Dan. 10:4).
The Archaeological Encyclopedia of the Holy Land
Hiddekel
HIDDEKEL This is the Hebrew name for the Tigris, one of the two large rivers of Mesopotamia which according to Genesis (2:14), flowed from the Garden of Eden. It is formed by the confluence of two rivers that draw their waters from the mountains of Armenia. On its way southwards from Lake Van it receives
Dictionary of Deities and Demons in the Bible
Tigris
TIGRIS חדקלI. The OT refers to the Tigris as Ḥiddeqel. The designation hannāhār haggādôl, “the Great River” was applied to the Tigris in Dan 10:14, but otherwise refers to the →Euphrates. The two rivers appear as a pair in the expression ʾaram naharayim, “the Land of the Two Rivers”, i.e. (Western)
See also