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Tetrarch
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Tetrarch
Tetrarch Referred to the ruler over the fourth part of a province. After Herod the Great’s death, Palestine was divided into tetrarchies among his sons (Matt 14:1–9; Luke 3:1, 19; 9:7; Acts 13:1). For further information, see these articles: Herod the Great; Herod Antipas; Palestine, Administration of,
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Tetrarch
Tetrarch. Title of a class of Roman provincial officials. Tetrarchs were tributary princes who were not deemed important enough to be designated kings. The title was used in the Roman provinces of Thessaly, Galatia, and Syria. The origin of the title appears to have come from governors who ruled over
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Tetrarch
Tetrarch tetʹrärk [Gk. tetraárchēs < tetrás—‘four’ + arché̄—‘ruler’ (Mt. 14:1; Lk. 3:19; 9:7; Acts 13:1), part of tetraarchéō—‘be tetrarch’ (Lk. 3:1)]; NEB PRINCE. A term that originally meant “ruler of a fourth part” (Strabo Geog xii.5.1 [567]). Euripides provided the first attestation of the
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Tetrarch
TETRARCH* Title of a class of Roman provincial officials. Tetrarchs were tributary princes who were not deemed important enough to be designated kings. The title was used in the Roman provinces of Thessaly, Galatia, and Syria. The origin of the title appears to have come from governors who ruled over
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Tetrarch
tetrarch (tet´rahrk), originally the title for “a ruler of a fourth” or “one of four rulers.” In Hellenistic and Roman times, however, it was applied somewhat loosely to petty rulers of dependent states; a tetrarch is lower in status than an ethnarch, who, in turn, is lower than a king. The term occurs
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Tetrarch
TETRARCH. Originally the ruler of a fourth part of a region. It may be used in this sense for Herod Antipas, tetrarch of Galilee (Mt 14:1; Lk 3:1, 19; 9:7; Acts 13:1), and Herod Philip, tetrarch of Ituraea and Trachonitis (Lk 3:1), sons of Herod the Great, each of whom inherited a fourth of his father’s
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Tetrarch
TETRARCH. This title (Gk. tetraarchēs, contracted tetrarchēs) was used in classical Gk. to denote the ruler of a fourth part of a region, and especially applied to the rulers of the four regions of Thessaly. The Romans gave it to any ruler of part of an Oriental province. When Herod the Great, who
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Tetrarch
TetrarchOriginating in 5th-century Greece, a title used as far away as Thessaly and Galatia. Although Gk. tetrárchēs originally meant “ruler of a fourth” part of a tribe or country, by Roman times it had become a favorite designation for provincial rulers in Palestine. “Tetrarch” referred to emperor-appointed
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Tetrarch
Tetrarch [tĕtˊrärk] (Gk. tetrárchēs). Originally the “ruler of a fourth part” of some region; later used more broadly of a number of client rulers in the Roman Empire lower in rank than kings. After the death of Herod the Great, his kingdom was divided among three of his sons, Archelaus receiving
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Tetrarch
TETRARCH A title literally meaning “ruler of one fourth.” In Hellenic usage, it referred to a ruler of lesser rank than a king, such as a prince. Under the Romans, the tetrarch was a ruler over an eastern territory or province who enjoyed less autonomy than a king. In Palestine in the early first century
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Tetrarch
Tetrarch, properly the sovereign or governor of the fourth part of a country. Matt. 14:1; Luke 3:1; 9:7; Acts 13:1. The title was, however, often applied to any one who governed a Roman province, of whatever size. The title of king was sometimes assigned to a tetrarch. Matt. 14:9; Mark 6:14, 22.
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Tetrarch
TETRARCH (Gk. tetrarchēs). Properly the sovereign or governor of the fourth part of a country.1. Herod Antipas (Matt. 14:1; Luke 3:1, 19; 9:7; Acts 13:1), who is commonly distinguished as “Herod the tetrarch,” although the title of “king” is also assigned to him both by Matthew (14:9) and by Mark (6:14,