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Tartan
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Tartan
Tartan (תַּרְתָּן‎, tartan). A title of a high Assyrian commander (2 Kgs 18:17; Isa 20:1). Like Rabsaris and Rabshakeh, this title has been regarded as a proper name, but is more likely a designation. The title is attributed to one of Sennacherib’s messengers to Hezekiah (2 Kgs 18:17) and to one of Sargon’s
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Tartan
TARTAN [Heb tartān (תַּרְתָּן)]. The tartan (Assyrian turtānu) was a high-ranking Assyrian official who, together with the RABSHAKEH and the RABSARIS, played an important role in the siege of Jerusalem by Sennacherib as described in 2 Kings 18–19. For further details about the siege, see SENNACHERIB.
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Tartan
Tartan. Highest-ranking Assyrian official, second in command only to the king himself. He was the commander in chief of the Assyrian army. Sargon II, king of Assyria (722–705 bc), ordered his commander to subdue and capture the Philistine city of Ashdod (Is 20:1). The tartan was one of three officials
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Tartan
Tartan tär̀tən [Heb. tartān; Akk. tartanu, turtanu, “second (in command)”]; NEB COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF. The title of an Assyrian general. The word occurs in 2 K. 18:17 and Isa. 20:1 (RSV “commander in chief”), and, until the Assyrian usage became known, was taken as a proper name. In view of Aram te,
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Tartan
TARTAN* Title of the highest-ranking Assyrian official, second in command only to the king. The tartan was the commander in chief of the Assyrian army. The position is mentioned in two OT passages: (1) Sargon II, king of Assyria (722–705 bc), ordered his commander to subdue and capture the Philistine
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Tartan
Tartan (tahr´tan), an official title of rank within the Assyrian military, the commander-in-chief or field marshal second only to the king. An officer of this rank led Sargon’s assault against Ashdod (ca. 712 bce; Isa. 20:1). Another officer of this rank was sent by Sennacherib along with two other officials,
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Tartan
TARTAN. The title (Heb. tartān from Assyrian turtānu or tartanu) of an Assyrian army general (cf. RSV “commander-in-chief,” Isa 20:1), a rank borne by two individuals mentioned in the Bible. One, serving under Sargon II, effected the capture of Ashdod (c. 711 b.c., Isa 20:1); the other was dispatched
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Tartan
TARTAN. The title of a high Assyrian officer. Two are mentioned in the OT. The first was sent by Sargon II to besiege and capture Ashdod in 711 bc (Is. 20:1, av). The second came from Sennacherib with other officials (*Rabsaris, *Rabshakeh) and a military force to demand the surrender of Jerusalem in
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Tartan
Tartan (Heb. tartān; Akk. turtānu, tartanu)A high functionary in the Assyrian army, possibly commander in chief (so NRSV at Isa. 20:1); the NJB rendering “cupbearer in chief” suggests an even more significant rank. The OT alludes to two such officials without giving their names: one sent by Sargon
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Tartan
Tartan [tärˊtăn] (Heb. tartān; Akk. turtānu, tartanu). A high functionary in the Assyrian army, possibly commander in chief (so RSV at Isa. 20:1; cf. NIV “supreme commander”); the JB rendering “cupbearer in chief” suggests an even more significant rank. The Old Testament alludes to two
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Tartan
TARTAN The title of a high-ranking Assyrian official. A Tartan was sent by Sargon II to besiege Ashdod (Isa 20:1); likewise, a Tartan was part of the delegation of officials sent by Sennacherib to demand the surrender of Jerusalem in 701 b.c. (2 Kgs 18:17).
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Tartan
Tar´tan, which occurs only in 2 Kings 18:17 and Isa. 20:1, has been generally regarded as a proper name; but like Rabsaris and Rabshakeh, it is more probably an official designation, and indicates the Assyrian commander-in-chief.
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