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Syriac Language
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A Semitic language used in the more extended Christian literature.This article will first consider the Syriac language from the perspective of its relevance to the Bible, ancient literature, and history. It will then present recent research regarding its origins, development, and linguistic features.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Syriac Language
Syriac Language A Semitic language used in the more extended Christian literature.This article will first consider the Syriac language from the perspective of its relevance to the Bible, ancient literature, and history. It will then present recent research regarding its origins, development, and linguistic
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Syriac; Syrian Language
SYRIAC; SYRIAN LANGUAGE. The Syrian language referred to in the KJV (2 Kgs 18:26; Ezr 4:7; Isa 36:11; Dan 2:4) is Aramaic, not the modern Syriac. It is a Semitic language widely used in numerous dialects through the ancient Middle East. During the Exile it displaced Hebrew as the spoken language of the
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Syriac
SyriacA form of late Eastern Aramaic; a member of the Aramaic subfamily of Northwest Semitic languages. The Syriac alphabet comprising 22 consonants is written in three forms: Estrangela, found in the oldest inscriptions and manuscripts; Nestorian, used primarily by the Syrian Christians in the Persian
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Syriac
Syriac [sĭrˊĭ ăk].* A late form of Eastern Aramaic, arising ca. the mid-first century A.D. in northern Mesopotamia and generally associated with the city of Edessa (modern Urfa). Its greatest importance as a literary language emerged from the translation of the Old and New Testament into Syriac.
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Syriac
Syriac. The Syriac language is a branch of Aramaic which was spoken in *Edessa and its neighbourhood from shortly before the beginning of the Christian era. It was extensively used in the early Church owing to the active Christian communities in those parts. From an early date it was employed in translations
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Syriac
SYR´IAC (siri-ak). The KJV rendering in Dan. 2:4; compare “Syrian tongue” (Ezra 4:7, KJV) or “Syrian language” (2 Kings 18:26; Isa. 36:11; both in KJV). A more correct rendering of this Heb. term (˒ărāmı̂t) is Aramaic (which see.)
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Syriac
Syriac(2 Kings 18:26; Ezra 4:7; Dan. 2:4), more correctly rendered “Aramaic,” including both the Syriac and the Chaldee languages. In the New Testament there are several Syriac words, such as “Eloi, Eloi, lama sabachthani?” (Mark 15:34; Matt. 27:46 gives the Heb. form, “Eli, Eli”), “Raca” (Matt. 5:22),
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
SYRIA
SYRIA<sir’-i-ak>: In Dan 2:4, for the King James Version “Syriack” the Revised Version (British and American) has “Syrian,” and in the margin “Or, `in Aramaic.’”See ARAMAIC LANGUAGE; LANGUAGES OF THE OLD TESTAMENT
Pocket Dictionary of Liturgy & Worship
Syriac
Syriac. A language of the ancient *Syrian church that is a later dialect of Aramaic, the language Jesus spoke.
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 5, Q–Z
Syriac, Syrian
Syriac, Syrian sihr’ee-ak, -uhn). The KJV uses the form Syriack to render ʾărāmî H811 in Dan. 2:4 (“Then spake the Chaldeans to the king in Syriack”), but Syrian in the other occurrences of that Hebrew term (2 Ki. 18:26; Ezra 4:7; Isa. 36:11). In all of these passages the reference is to the Aramaic
The Eerdmans Encyclopedia of Early Christian Art and Archaeology, Volumes 1–3
Paleography: Syriac
Paleography: SyriacThe Syriac script is an offshoot of the earlier Aramaic script used in the Achaemenid Persian Empire (550–330 b.c.). The earlier Aramaic script was relatively uniform, with regional variants beginning to emerge only after the fall of the Persian Empire (Naveh, 1982, 83–84, 132; Brock