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Succoth (on the Jordan)
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A city east of the Jordan River, in the plain north of the Jabbok River (known today as the Zarqa River) and about one mile from it. On his return from Paddan-aram after his encounter with Esau, Jacob (Gen 32:17, 30; 33:17) built a house for himself here and made booths (skwt) for his livestock.The book of Joshua identifies Succoth as part of the territory belonging to Sihon, king of Heshbon. This was during the time of the Israelite conquest, when it was assigned to the tribe of Dan (Josh 13:27). However, the biblical text suggests that even some centuries later, the city remained in non-Israelite hands. According to Judges 8:5–17, when Gideon was waging war against the Midianites, he asked the inhabitants of Succoth for provisions for his army. But they and the residents of Penuel refused Gideon’s petition, perhaps because they were not sure about the outcome of the war. The narrative describes Gideon punishing the leaders of Succoth and Penuel (Judg 8:18–21). In Malamat’s view, Gideon’s actions suggest that Succoth and Penuel might have been his vassals (Malamat, “Punishment,” 70).Succoth is mentioned in the historical books of Kings and Chronicles in relationship to the building of Solomon’s temple. It was between Succoth and Zarethan that Hiram found proper clay ground to cast all the burnished bronze vessels and utensils for the temple (1 Kgs 7:46; 2 Chr 4:17). In Psalms there are two references to the Valley of Succoth as a desirable land for apportionment among the righteous (Pss 60:6; 108:7). The psalmist mentions the Valley of Succoth in Psalms in order “to substantiate claims of ownership east of the Jordan” (MacDonald, East of the Jordan, 143).
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Succoth on the Jordan
Succoth on the Jordan (סֻכּוֹת‎, sukkoth). A city east of the Jordan River, in the plain north of the Jabbok River (known today as the Zarqa River) and about one mile from it. On his return from Paddan-aram after his encounter with Esau, Jacob (Gen 32:17, 30; 33:17) built a house for himself here and
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Succoth (Place)
SUCCOTH (PLACE) [Heb sukkôt (סֻכֹּות)]. The name of two places mentioned in the OT.1. The first station of the Exodus located in the NE delta of Egypt (Exod 12:37; Num 33:5). The Israelites left Rameses and pitched in Succoth and then journeyed to Etham where they camped on the “edge of the wilderness” (Exod
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Succoth
Succoth. 1. Town in the Jordan Valley listed along with other towns in the inheritance of Gad (Jos 13:27). It is located in the fertile valley called Ghaur Abu ‘Udeidah, known in the Bible as the Valley of Succoth (Ps 60:6; 108:7) and comprising the central portion of the Jordan Valley on the eastern
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Succoth
1. A city situated E of the Jordan River, not far from the Jabbok River. Located in the central Jordan Valley, Succoth was within the kingdom of Sihon before it was alloted to the tribe of Gad (Josh. 13:27). It is first mentioned in connection with Jacob’s travels near the Jabbok, where he wrestled an
Succoth
Succoth sukʹəth, sukʹōth [Heb. sukkôṯ, sukkōṯ—‘booths’; Gk. Sokchōth, Skēnai, etc.].
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Succoth
SUCCOTH1. Town in the Jordan Valley listed along with other towns as belonging to the tribe of Gad (Jos 13:27). It is located in the fertile valley called Ghaur Abu ‘Udeidah, known in the Bible as the valley of Succoth (Pss 60:6; 108:7); it comprises the central portion of the Jordan Valley on the eastern
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Succoth
Succoth (suhk´uhth; Heb., “booths,” “tents,” or “temporary dwellings”).1 A town in the Jordan Valley on the “Way of the Plain” (2 Sam. 18:23), which connected it with such towns as Adam, Zarethan, and Pella, and on a major route from the central Levant to the Transjordan. Jacob returned from the east
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Succoth
SUCCOTH. As a common noun it is the plural of Heb. sukkâ, “thicket, booth,” and is frequently used of temporary shelters for man or beast. It appears in the name of the harvest festival. Feast of Booths (Tabernacles), which also commemorated the wilderness wanderings of the Exodus, during which the
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Succoth
SUCCOTH. 1. First site on the journey of the Israelites during the Exodus, possibly equivalent to the Old Egyp. ṯkw (Pithom), which was in the E part of Wadi Tumilat (Ex. 12:37; 13:20; Nu. 33:5–6). This was the normal way in or out of Egypt for displaced persons. We find it mentioned in the Story of
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Succoth
Succoth (Heb. sukkôṯ)1. The first encampment of the Israelites during the exodus from Egypt, after leaving Rameses (Exod. 12:37; Num. 33:5–6). Many scholars have suggested that Succoth is an adaption of Egyptian Tjeku (Egyp. tkw), located near Egypt’s western border, although there is some debate
The Archaeological Encyclopedia of the Holy Land
Succoth
SUCCOTH a) The first station on the route of the Exodus, between Rameses and Etham (Exod. 12:37; 13:20), tentatively identified with a place near Jebel Mariyam, on the west bank of Lake Timsah, 15 miles from Tell el-Maskhute.b) A city in the territory of Gad, east of the River Jordan, but not far from
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Succoth
SUCCOTH (Hebrew, “booths” or “tabernacles”)1. The first site reached by the Israelites during the Exodus; it was located in the Nile’s eastern delta between Rameses and Etham (Exod 12:37, 13:20; Num 33:5–6). The site is probably Tell el-Maskhuta in the Wadi Tumilat.2. A city located in Transjordan