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Spit
Saliva • Spittle
Dictionaries
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Spit; Spittle
Spit; Spittle [Heb. yāraq (Nu. 12:14; Dt. 25:9), rāqaq (Lev. 15:18), rōq (Job 30:10; Isa. 50:6), tōp̱eṯ—‘object of spitting’ (“one before whom men spit,” Job 17:6); Gk. ptýō (Mk. 7:33; 8:23; Jn. 9:6), emptýō (Mt. 26:67; etc.)]; AV also TABRET (Job 17:6); NEB also PORTEND (Job 17:6); SPITTLE
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Spit, Spittle
SPIT, SPITTLE. The acts of spitting on or toward a person is an expression of extreme contempt and rejection throughout the Bible (Num 12:14; Job 17:6, ASV, NASB; 30:10). A man refusing to enter into levirate marriage was to be shamed publicly by having the wife of his deceased brother spit in his face
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Spit
SpitIn both the OT and NT spitting is regarded as a sign of contempt (Job 17:6; 30:10; Isa. 50:6; Mark 10:34; 14:65; 15:19). At Deut. 25:9 (and perhaps Num. 12:14) it is part of a legal ritual of humiliation. Ritual uncleanness was conveyed by spitting (Lev. 15:8). “Until I swallow my spittle” (Job
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Spit
Spit (Heb. verbs yāraq, rāqaq, nouns rōq, rîr “saliva”; Gk. verb (em)ptýō, noun ptýsma).† In both the Old and New Testament, spitting is regarded as a sign of contempt (Job 17:6; Heb. tōp̱eṯ; KJV “a tabret”, 30:10; Isa. 50:6; Mark 10:34; 14:65; 15:19). At Deut. 25:9 (and perhaps Num.
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Spit, Spittle
SPIT, SPITTLE (Heb. from rāqaq; yāraq, Num. 12:14; Deut. 25:9; Gk. ptusma). A source of legal defilement, e.g., the spittle of a person having an issue defiled the one upon whom it fell (Lev. 15:8). To spit in one’s face was regarded as the grossest insult (Num. 12:14; Deut. 25:9; Isa. 50:6; Matt.
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Spit, Spittle
SPIT, SPITTLE — saliva, the liquid formed in the mouth. Under the Mosaic Law, the spit of certain sick persons was recognized as unclean (Lev. 15:8). Lack of control of one’s own saliva indicated insanity (1 Sam. 21:13).Spitting in the face was a gesture of contempt, a deliberate insult (Num. 12:14;
Saliva
SALIVA — the watery secretion of the saliva glands (1 Sam. 21:13; John 9:6). Job spoke of saliva in a figurative sense when he indicated he was tormented continuously by God, unable even to swallow his saliva in peace (Job 7:19).
Dictionary of Biblical Imagery
Spit
SpitThe image of spit, when combined with the related images of saliva, spew and vomit, illustrates the great flexibility of figurative language in the Bible. Of the thirty-three uses of these words, only seventeen refer to a literal spitting or vomiting; the rest are wholly figurative. And of the seventeen
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
SPIT; SPITTLE
SPIT; SPITTLE<spit>, <spit’-l> [יָרַקyaraq], [רֹק‎, roq]; [(ἐμ)πτύω, (em)ptuo]): Spitting in a person’s face indicated gross contempt (Nu 12:14; Dt 25:9; Job 30:10; Isa 50:6; Mt 26:67; 27:30, etc.); when performed by an unclean person it produced defilement (Lev 15:8) which necessitated
Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Spit, Spittle
SPIT, SPITTLE Spitting at or on someone is the strongest sign of contempt. The brother who refused to perform levirate marriage (have a child by his brother’s wife to carry on the name of the brother, Deut. 25:5–6) would have his face spit in by the spurned wife of the brother (Deut. 25:7–9). The soldiers
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 5, Q–Z
Spit
spit. In the OT the action of spitting (Heb. yāraq H3762 and rāqaq H8394) usually indicates a purposeful deed with an added notion of ritual defilement or legal rejection (Lev. 15:8; Num. 12:14; Deut. 25:9). The nominal form of this term (rōq H8371, “spittle”) has a similar nuance (Job 30:10; Isa.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Spit, Spittle
SPIT, spit, SPITTLE, spitʹ’l (יָרַק‎, yāraḳ, רֹק‎, rōḳ; [ἐμ]πτύω, [em]ptúō): Spitting in a person’s face indicated gross contempt (Nu 12:14; Dt 25:9; Job 30:10; Isa 50:6; Mt 26:67; 27:30, etc); when performed by an unclean person it produced defilement (Lev 15:8) which necessitated washing the
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
SPIT
SPIT [יָרַקyaraq, רָקַקraqaq; ἐμπτύω emptyō, πτύσμα ptysma, πτύω ptyō]. Spitting signifies derision and shame, as well illustrated in Isa 50:6 and Num 12:14. Deuteronomic legislation specifies that a widow must spit in the face of a brother-in-law who refuses the levirate responsibility (Deut 25:9).