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Spirit of Church at Laodicea
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Angels of the Seven Churches
Angels of the Seven Churches (ἄγγελοι τῶν ἑπτὰ ἐκκλησιῶν, angeloi tōn hepta ekklēsiōn). The meaning ascribed to the seven stars of Rev 1:20 and recipients of the seven messages in Rev 2–3.
Laodicea
Laodicea (Λαοδικείᾳ, Laodikeia). One of several Greek cities of the same name in Asia and Asia Minor built by the Seleucids during the third century bc. The biblical Laodicea—designated “Laodicea on the Lycus” (Laodicea ad Lycum)—was located in Phrygia’s Lycus Valley, north of Colossae near present-day
Seven Churches
Seven Churches Congregations to whom John is instructed to write in Revelation 2–3; located in seven cities of western Asia Minor: Ephesus, Smyrna, Pergamum, Thyatira, Sardis, Philadelphia, and Laodicea.At the start of John’s vision in Revelation, he is told to write letters to these churches—or, more
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Angels of the Seven Churches
ANGELS OF THE SEVEN CHURCHES (Gk aggeloi tōn hepta ekklēsiōn (ἀγγελοι των ἑπτα ἑκκλησιων)). This expression is found only in Rev 1:20 in the preparatory vision of the risen Lord (1:9–20). Here the angels of the seven churches are equated with the seven stars in the Lord’s right hand (cf. 1:16).
Laodicea (Place)
LAODICEA (PLACE) [Gk Laodikeia (Λαοδικεια)]. A city in the Lycus valley of SW Phrygia, hence called Laodicea ad Lycum to distinguish it from other cities of the same name.A. The Hellenistic and Roman CityB. Jewish SettlementC. The Church of LaodiceaA. The Hellenistic and Roman CityLaodicea was founded
Seven Churches
SEVEN CHURCHES [Gk hai hepta ekklēsiai (αἱ ἑπτα ἑκκλησιαι)]. The seven churches are those in seven cities of the Roman province of proconsular Asia on the west central coast of Asia Minor. They are the addressees of Revelation (1:4, 11, 20), and individual letters are addressed to each of them in
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Laodicea, Laodiceans
Laodicea, Laodiceans. Largest of three cities in the broad valley area on the borders of Phrygia, Laodicea stood where the Lycus Valley joined the Maeander. Significantly, the western entrance to the city was called the Ephesian Gate. The traveler left the city on the east by the Syrian Gate, for the
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Angels of the Seven Churches
Angels of the Seven Churches It is evident from the contexts of the various biblical passages in which the word “angel” appears that the word does not always represent the same idea. In such passages as Dnl. 12:1 and Acts 12:15 it would seem that the angel was generally regarded as a superhuman being
Laodicea
Laodicea la-od-ə-sēʹə [Gk. Laodikia, or in most Greek literature Laodikeia] (Col. 2:1; 4:13–16; Rev. 1:11; 3:14–22). A city of Asia Minor.The ancient town of Diospolis (“city of Zeus”) or Rhoas was fortified as a Seleucid outpost by Antiochus II ca 250 b.c. and renamed for his wife Laodice. Situated
Seven Churches
Seven Churches [Gk. hai heptá ekklēsíai] (Rev. 1:4, 11, 20). The seven churches of Asia to which the book of Revelation is addressed, located in the cities of Ephesus, Smyrna, Pergamum, Thyatira, Sardis, Philadelphia, and Laodicea (1:11). Individual letters are addressed to these churches in chs 2–3.
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Laodicea, Laodiceans
LAODICEA, LAODICEANS* Largest of three cities and its residents in the broad valley area on the borders of Phrygia, Laodicea stood where the Lycus Valley joined the Meander. Significantly, the western entrance to the city was called the Ephesian Gate. The traveler left the city on the east by the Syrian
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Laodicea
Laodicea (lay-od´i-see´uh), a prosperous commercial city in the region of Phrygia in northwest Asia Minor. It was named by Antiochus II of the Seleucid dynasty, which ruled Syria after the death of Alexander the Great. He named the city for his wife, Laodice. Situated on a plateau in the south of the
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Angels of the Seven Churches
ANGELS OF THE SEVEN CHURCHES. Rev 2–3 contains a series of letters addressed to the “angels” of the churches at Ephesus, Smyrna, Pergamos, Thyatira, Sardis, Philadelphia, and Laodicea—all in Asia Minor. The letters contain words of praise, censure, and exhortation, with attendant warning in the event
Laodicea
LAODICEA. A city of the Roman province of Asia in the area of Phrygia. Laodicea stood on an 850-foot hill ten miles from Colosse up the broad valley of the Lycus, a tributary of the Meander. It was c. 90 miles E of Ephesus by road on the great commercial route from the coast into the interior of Asia
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Angels of the Churches
ANGELS OF THE CHURCHES. The ‘seven stars’ of the Patmos vision are explained as referring to ‘the angels (angeloi) of the seven churches’ (Rev. 1:20), to whom the letters of Rev. 2 and 3 are then addressed. The ‘angel’ concept is problematic. It is often taken either of guardian angels or of human leaders
Laodicea
LAODICEA. A city of SW Phrygia, in the Roman province of Asia, in the W of what is now Asiatic Turkey. It was founded by the Seleucid Antiochus II in the 3rd century bc, and called after his wife Laodice. It lay in the fertile valley of the Lycus (a tributary of the Maeander), close to *Hierapolis and
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Laodicea
Laodicea (Gk. Laodɩ́keia)A city in Asia Minor, one of the seven churches addressed in Rev. 1–3. Laodicea ad Lycum was founded ca. 250 b.c. by the Syrian king Antiochus II, who named it after his wife Laodice. It stood on an elevated plateau in the Lychus River valley and was located ca. 10 km. (6 mi.)
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Laodicea
Laodicea [lāŏdˊə sēˊə] (Gk. Laodikeia). A city in Asia Minor (Rev. 1:11), rebuilt on the site of ancient Rhoas (Diospolis) ca. 250 B. C. by Antiochus II Theos and named after his wife Laodice. The ruins of the city are on the outskirts of modern Denizli, 10 km. (6 mi.) south of ancient Hierapolis
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Laodicea
LAODICEA A city in the Lycus Valley of Phrygia, in Asia Minor (Col 2:1; 4:13, 15). Laodicea was founded by the Seleucid ruler Antiochus II in the third century b.c. and named after his wife, Laodice. From the beginning, the city’s position on the main trade route between the eastern and western Roman
Seven Churches
SEVEN CHURCHES Seven Christian communities in seven cities of Asia Minor: Ephesus, Smyrna, Pergamum, Thyatira, Sardis, Philadelphia, and Laodicea. The churches are addressed in Rev 1:4, 11, 20, and individual letters are sent to them in Rev 2–3. All seven churches were geographically in the region that
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Angels of the Churches
Angels of the Churches. The seven angels of the Churches of *Ephesus, *Smyrna, *Pergamum, *Thyatira, *Sardis, *Philadelphia, and *Laodicea mentioned in Rev. 1–3. To whom or what is the reference is much disputed. If the angels are men they may be bishops occupying their sees; if heavenly beings, they
Laodicea
Laodicea. A Hellenistic city of the Roman province of Asia. It was the seat of an early Christian Church to which St *Paul wrote an epistle (Col. 4:16), perhaps the same as the extant Eph. The city was reproved at a somewhat later date by the writer of *Rev. (3:14 ff.) for being ‘neither cold nor
Seven Churches
Seven Churches. The Churches in Asia Minor to which the letter of St *John, incorporated in Rev. (1–3), was addressed, namely *Ephesus, *Smyrna, *Pergamum, *Thyatira, *Sardis, *Philadelphia, and *Laodicea. A separate message for each of these Churches, appropriate to its particular temporal and spiritual
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