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Spearhead
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Spear
Spear (חֲנִית‎, chanith; λόγχη, lonchē). A weapon made up of a blade attached to the end of a stick; typically used in close range combat, though it could be thrown (e.g., 1 Sam 13:22; 26:11–12; John 19:34). For more information on weapons and war in biblical times, see this article: War in the Ancient
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Spear
spear, a close-range weapon composed of a long wooden shaft on which was mounted a shorter, pointed blade (i.e., spearhead). During the biblical period, the spearhead was usually made of bronze or iron and attached to the shaft in various ways. Through most of the spear’s early history, a blade was inserted
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Lance
A Hittite soldier from Carchemish with lance (8th cen. b.c.). Hittite Museum, AnkaraLANCE. An offensive weapon used in battle (Jer 50:42). The Heb. kı̂dôn is translated “spear” in five other passages in the KJV. In the War Scroll from Qumran Cave a the kı̂dôn is a sword. The Heb rōmah is more correctly
Lancet
LANCET. The word appears in the KJV at 1 Kgs 18:28 an older form of the word “lance” (KJV, NASB, etc.). translating Heb. rōmah. This weapon began to supplant the heavier spear (hănı̂t) in the 1st mil. b.c., although the rōmah was in use in Moses’ time (Num 25:7, KJV “javelin”) and during the period
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Spear
SpearOriginally a blade with a thin tail inserted in a wooden shaft and held with binding. In the 2nd millennium the socketed head was introduced. At this time metal butts also appeared, which enabled the end of the spear to be used as a club or stuck in the ground when not in use (1 Sam. 26:7; 2 Sam.
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Spear
Spear (Heb. anîṯ, rōmaḥ; Gk. lónchē).† An extremely common offensive weapon consisting of a long shaft with a point made of stone or iron (cf. 1 Sam. 13:22; 17:7) set on one end. In Old Testament usage Heb. kîḏôn generally represents a javelin (so usually RSV), a light spear that
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Spear
SPEAR A weapon with a shaft and point: a javelin, spike, or lance might also be called a “spear.” A soldier might carry several spears into battle (1 Sam 17:6). A long spear or javelin was struck into the ground to denote the place chosen for the tent of the king (1 Sam 26:7).
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Lancet
Lancet. This word is found in 1 Kings 18:28 only. The Hebrew term is romach, which is elsewhere rendered, and appears to mean a javelin or light spear. In the original edition of the DAV (1611) the word is “lancers.”
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Lances
LANCES (Heb. rōmaḥ, to “hurl,” 1 Kings 18:28; cf. Job 39:23; 41:29, NIV). This word is elsewhere rendered and appears to mean a javelin, or light spear. It may mean the iron point or head of a lance. See Armor: Spear, Javelin, Dart.
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Spear
Spearspear, a close-range weapon composed of a long wooden shaft on which was mounted a shorter, pointed blade (i.e., spearhead). During the biblical period, the spearhead was usually made of bronze or iron, and it was attached to the shaft in various ways. Through most of the spear’s early history,
Dictionary of Phrase and Fable
Spear
Spear. Cairbar asks if Fingal comes in peace, to which Mor-annal replies: “In peace he comes not, king of Erin, I have seen his forward spear.” If a stranger kept the point of his spear forward when he entered a strange land, it was a declaration of war; if he carried the spear on his shoulder with the