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Song of Ascents
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A heading given to 15 psalms (Psa 120–134) associated collectively with “going up.”Four of these songs are attributed to David, one to Solomon, and the rest are unattributed. Two theories regarding the original setting of these songs are:1. The Mishnah draws a parallel between the 15 Songs of Ascents and the 15 steps that led from the court of women to the court of Israel in the temple, specifically during the Feast of Tabernacles (m. Sukkah, 5.4). While the Mishnah does not state whether the songs were sung on the steps during temple worship, this connection is made explicit in the Tosefta by t. Sukkah, 4.7–9 (Mitchell, Message, 110).2. The Songs of Ascents may have been used in the context of pilgrimage to Jerusalem for the Feast of Tabernacles (Mitchell, Message, 113–14). The verb “go up” (עלה‎, 'lh) is used specifically in Psa 122:4 in this sense of ascending to Jerusalem.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Song of Ascents
Song of Ascents (שִׁיר חַמַּעֲלוֹת‎, shir chamma'aloth). A heading given to 15 psalms (Psa 120–134) associated collectively with “going up.”Four of these songs are attributed to David, one to Solomon, and the rest are unattributed. Two theories regarding the original setting of these songs are:1. The
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Song of Ascents, Song of Degrees
Song of Ascents, Song of Degrees. Title given to each of the Psalms from 120 to 134. Perhaps these psalms were sung by pilgrims journeying up to Jerusalem for the major feasts.See Music and Musical Instruments; Psalms, Book of.
Ascents, Song of
Ascents, Song of. Superscription of Psalms 120–134.See Song of Ascents, Song of Degrees.
Degrees, Song of
Degrees, Song of. Superscription of Psalms 120–134 (kjv).See Song of Ascents, Song of Degrees.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Ascents, Song of
Ascents, Song of [Heb. šîr hamma‘alôṯ]; AV SONG OF DEGREES; NEB omits. The title prefixed to Pss. 120–134. The meaning is still doubtful, but there are four main views as to its significance: (1) The Jewish interpretation. According to the Mishnah (Middoth ii.5; cf. Sukkah 51b), there was in the
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Song of Ascents, Song of Degrees
SONG OF ASCENTS, SONG OF DEGREES* Title given to each of the Psalms from 120 to 134. Perhaps these psalms were sung by pilgrims journeying up to Jerusalem for the major feasts. See Music; Musical Instruments; Psalms, Book of.
Ascents, Song of
ASCENTS, SONG OF Superscription of Psalms 120–134. See Song of Ascents, Song of Degrees.
Degrees, Song of
DEGREES*, SONG OF Superscription of Psalms 120–134 (kjv). See Song of Ascents, Song of Degrees.
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Song of Ascent
Song of Ascent, a musical piece sung by pilgrims as they climbed the hill to Jerusalem at the time of festivals such as the Festival of Tabernacles, the Festival of Weeks, and the Passover, which were celebrated in the temple. A number of such songs are preserved as Pss. 120–134. See also music; Psalms,
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Degrees, Song of
DEGREES, SONG OFThe KJV translation of the titles of Ps 120–134. The RSV and NASB call each “A Song of Ascents.” The Heb. ma˓ălôt literally means “goings up.” The expression has been interpreted in different ways. Some see in it a reference to songs sung by pilgrims going up (“ascending”) to Jerusalem
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Ascents, Songs of
Ascents, Songs ofA collection of 15 psalms (Pss. 120–134) of various types united by the Hebrew superscript šɩ̂r hammaʿălôṯ, “the song of the ascents” (šɩ̂r lammaʿălôṯ in Ps. 121). Four interpretations of the superscript have been suggested. (1) Origen and Augustine understood it as referring
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Ascents, Song of
Ascents, Song of (Heb. šîr hamma˓alôṯ; “song of processions” [KoB, p. 548]). The title (so RSV, JB, NIV; KJV “Song of degrees”) of a collection of some fifteen psalms (Pss. 120–134), probably sung by Israelite pilgrims en route to the great feasts at Jerusalem. Since Jerusalem is situated
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Gradual Psalms
Gradual Psalms. The group of Psalms, Pss. 120–34, each of which bears a title in Hebrew rendered by St Jeromecanticum graduum’, and in the AV ‘A Song of Degrees’ ( RV, ‘Ascents’). Various explanations of the title have been offered, referring it: (1) to the supposed literary character of the Psalms,
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Degrees Songs of
Degrees, Songs of, a title given to fifteen Psalms, from 120 to 134 inclusive. Four of them are attributed to David, one is ascribed to the pen of Solomon, and the other ten give no indication of their author. With respect to the term rendered in the Authorized Version “degrees” a great diversity of
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Ascents, Song of
ASCENTS, SONG OF (“song of steps”). A title given to each of the fifteen psalms from 120 to 134. Four of them are attributed to David, one is ascribed to the pen of Solomon, and the other ten give no indication of their author.The opinion held by Rosenmüller, Herder, and others is that some of the psalms
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Degrees, Song of
Degrees, Song ofsong of steps, a title given to each of these fifteen psalms, 120–134 inclusive. The probable origin of this name is the circumstance that these psalms came to be sung by the people on the ascents or goings up to Jerusalem to attend the three great festivals (Deut. 16:16). They were
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