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Silk
Occupational Objects
Dictionaries
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Silk
Silk. Fine, delicate thread extracted from the cocoon of the silkworm. Originating in China, silk may have been introduced into Palestine as early as the Solomonic period (970–930 bc), or perhaps not until the conquests of Alexander the Great (336–323 bc). A fine silken fabric was apparently included
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Silk
Silk [Heb. mešî] (Ezk. 16:10, 13); NEB LAWN; [Gk. sirikón] (Rev. 18:12). It is improbable that true Oriental silk from silkworms was known to the people of the biblical world, although some words denoting fabric are so translated by the RSV. In Ezk. 16:10 Heb. mešî refers to a very fine and expensive
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Silk
SILK Fine, delicate thread extracted from the cocoon of the silkworm. Originating in China, silk may have been introduced into Palestine as early as Solomon’s reign (970–930 bc), or perhaps not until the conquests of Alexander the Great (336–323 bc). A fine silken fabric was apparently included in the
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Silk
The Siloam InscriptionSILK. The thread produced by caterpillars that feed on the leaves of the mulberry, which thread in turn is woven into a fine fabric identified in English by the word “silk” (Prov 31:22; Ezk 16:10, 13; Rev 18:12). The KJV renders the Heb. shêsh in Prov 31:22 as “silk,” but the
Yarn
YARN. The only use of the word “yarn” in the KJV occurs in the expression “linen yarn” of 1 Kgs 10:28 and 2 Chr 1:16. The Heb. word miqwēh thus translated appears to have been misinterpreted. It may instead be read “from Kue” (cf. LXX ek the koue and Vulg. de Coa). Kue is a name for Cilicia (q.v.).
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Silk
SILK. The rsv rendering of two biblical words. 1. Heb. mešî (Ezk. 16:10, 13), perhaps ‘silken thread’, but the sense is obscure. Since the Heb. word seems to be an Egyp. loan-word (usually meaning linen in Egyp.) and silk was not introduced into Egypt until the Roman period, some doubt is cast on the
Yarn
YARN. In the Bible the yarns mentioned are goats’ hair, camels’ hair, cotton (Heb. karpas; Est. 1:6; cf. EBi, 1, p. 915), linen and silk (Ezk. 16:10; Rev. 18:12). Cotton, from the lint around the seeds produced by the shrub Gossypium herbaceum, originated in ancient India, but spread E only in the Gk.
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Silk
SilkA rare and valuable textile produced by the larvae of the Chinese moth (Bombyx mori) and obtained by unwinding its cocoon. This tedious labor yields a lustrous, fine, yet strong filament, which can be dyed, spun, and woven. Known in the West by the 4th century b.c., true silk (Gk. sērikós) has
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Silk
Silk. *Silk cultivation, spinning, and weaving began in China and spread to the West only slowly. Raw silk was imported into western Asia by ca. the fifth century B.C. (Coa vestis, a form of silk derived from cocoons other than those of the true mulberry silkworm, apparently had been produced on
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Silk
Silk. The only undoubted notice of silk in the Bible occurs in Rev. 18:12, where it is mentioned among the treasures of the typical Babylon. It is, however, in the highest degree probable that the texture was known to the Hebrews from the time that their commercial relations were extended by Solomon.
Yarn
Yarn. The notice of yarn is contained in an extremely obscure passage in 1 Kings 10:28; 2 Chron. 1:16. The Hebrew Received Text is questionable. Gesenius gives the sense of “number” as applying equally to the merchants and the horses: “A band of the king’s merchants bought a drove (of horses) at a price.”
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Silk
SILK. This luxurious material doubtless was introduced into Bible lands from its home in China via India. Phoenician cities imported raw silk, as did Persia and S Europe. Tyre and Berytus were renowned for weaving it. It was a prize material among Medes and Persians, and Greeks knew it by the name “Median
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Silk
SilkHeb. demeshek, “damask,” silk cloth manufactured at Damascus, Amos 3:12. A.V., “in the corner of a bed, and in Damascus in a couch;” R.V., “in the corner of a couch, and on the silken cushions of a bed” (marg., “in Damascus on a bed”).Heb. meshi, (Ezek. 16:10, 13, rendered “silk”). In Gen. 41:42
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Silk
SILK — cloth woven from thread that was made from the Chinese silkworm. Although the word “silk” occurs a few times in the KJV and the NKJV, many scholars think the Hebrew word for silk should be rendered “fine linen” or “costly fabric” (Ezek. 16:10, 13; Prov. 31:22).The use of silk among the Egyptians
Yarn
YARN — a continuous strand of twisted threads used to form cloth. In Bible times, yarn was spun on a simple hand spindle from linen and wool fiber as well as the hair of camels and goats (Ex. 35:25–26).Lamb’s wool was considered the finest for yarn, although wool from sheep kept clean from dirt and
Dictionary of Biblical Imagery
Silk
SilkMost English translations of the Bible use the word silk only once-in a catalog of the worldwide mercantile goods traded by Babylon in Revelation 18:12. The RSV adds two more references (Ezek 16:10, 13). The closely related term “fine linen” appears more than five dozen times.The associations of