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Silas
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Silas the Apostle
Silas the Apostle (Σίλας, Silas). Also known as Silvanus (Σιλουανός, Silouanos) in the New Testament. A church leader among the brothers at the Jerusalem church. Accompanied Paul on his second missionary journey.
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Silas (Person)
SILAS (PERSON) [Gk Silas (Σιλας)]. Var. SILVANUS. The person called “Silas” in Acts is undoubtedly the same person named “Silvanus” in Paul’s letters. Silas was a Jewish Christian and possibly a Roman citizen (see Acts 16:37). Along with Judas called Barsabbas, Silas was a leading member, emissary, and
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Silas
Silas. Respected leader in the Jerusalem church, also called Silvanus (2 Cor 1:19; 1 Thes 1:1; 2 Thes 1:1; 1 Pet 5:12). “Silas” is most likely the Aramaic form of the Hebrew name “Saul,” which when given a Latin form became Silouanos (Silvanus). Silas thus carried two names, one Latin and one shorter
Silvanus
Silvanus. Latin name for Silas, a companion of Paul and Peter (2 Cor 1:19; 1 Thes 1:1; 2 Thes 1:1; 1 Pt 5:12).See Silas.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Silas
Silas sīʹlas [Gk. Silas]; SILVANUS sil-vāʹnəs [Gk. Silouanos]. A leader of the Jerusalem church who was later involved in ministries with Paul and Peter.
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Silas
SILAS Respected leader in the Jerusalem church, also called Silvanus (2 Cor 1:19; 1 Thes 1:1; 2 Thes 1:1; 1 Pt 5:12). “Silas” is most likely the Aramaic form of the Hebrew name “Saul,” which when given a Latin form became Silouanos (Silvanus). Silas thus carried two names—a Latin and a shorter, Semitic
Silvanus
SILVANUS* Latin name for Silas, a companion of Paul and Peter (2 Cor 1:19; 1 Thes 1:1; 2 Thes 1:1; 1 Pt 5:12). See Silas.
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Silas, Silvanus
Silas (si´luhs), Silvanus (sil-vay´nuhs), a leader in the early church and an associate of Paul. The Letters of Paul and 1 Peter refer to him as Silvanus (a Latinization), but Acts prefers Silas (either a Semitic or a shortened Greek form). According to the book of Acts, Silas and Judas Barsabbas, prophets
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Silas
SILAS. Silas first appears (Acts 15:22, 27, 32) in the NT narrative as one of the leading men sent to carry the decree of the Jerusalem council to the Gentile believers of Antioch, Syria, and Cilicia. He was probably. Hellenistic Jew since his name is the Gr. form of the Aram. She˒ı̂la˒, equivalent to
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Silas
SILAS. A leading member of the church at Jerusalem who also had prophetic gifts (Acts 15:22, 32). Silas may be a Semitic name, possibly še’îlā’, the Aram. form of Saul. There is little doubt that he is to be identified with ‘Silvanus’ (2 Cor. 1:19; 1 Thes. 1:1; 2 Thes. 1:1; 1 Pet. 5:12), which is
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Silas
Silas (Gk. Sɩ́las) (also SILVANUS)A leader of the Jerusalem church and companion of Paul on his second missionary journey (Acts 15:22–18:5). He is the same as Silvanus in the Epistles (2 Cor. 1:19; 1 Thess. 1:1; 2 Thess. 1:1; cf. Acts 16:19–24; 18:1–5; 1 Thess. 2:2). Silvanus is the Latin form and Silas
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Silas
Silas [sīˊləs] (Gk. Silas, Silouanos). A man from the Jerusalem church who became a coworker and traveling companion of Paul. The Greek form of the name used in Acts, Silas, derives from Aram. še˒îlā˒. Gk. Silouanos, used in the letters of Peter and Paul, represents Lat. Silvanus.Silas and
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Silas
SILAS A Jewish Christian and a leading member of the community in Jerusalem who was blessed with prophetic gifts (Acts 15:22, 32). He is also known as Silvanus (2 Cor 1:19; 1 Thess 1:1; 2 Thess 1:1; 1 Pet 5:12). Silas was sent with Judas by the Jerusalem church to Antioch to give welcome to Gentile Christians
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Silas, St
Silas, St. St *Paul’s companion on his first visit to Greece is called Silas in Acts. 15:22–18:5 (13 times). Paul calls him ‘Silvanus’ at 2 Cor. 1:19 (as does 1 Pet. 5:12) and associates him with himself in writing to the Thessalonians (1 and 2 Thess. 1:1). This led some of the Fathers to distinguish