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Serpent’s Stone
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Serpent’s Stone
Serpent’s Stone (אֶבֶן הַזֹּחֶלֶת‎, even hazzocheleth). Also called Zoheleth. The name of a landmark where Adonijah hosted a feast for the royalty of Judah (1 Kgs 1:5–9). In response to the event, David proclaimed Solomon as king, after which Adonijah fled.
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Serpent’s Stone (Place)
SERPENT’S STONE (PLACE) [Heb ʾeben hazzōḥelet (אֶבֶן הַזֹּחֶלֶת)]. A symbolic landmark at En Rogel where Adonijah, a rival of Solomon for King David’s throne, made sacrifices during his abortive attempt to become king (1 Kgs 1:9). The Hebrew word, zōḥelet is derived from a verb that means “to shrink
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Serpent’s Stone
Serpent’s Stone. Place where Adonijah, the son of David, sacrificed sheep and oxen and attempted to secretly set himself up as king (1 Kgs 1:9). The serpent’s stone was located near En-rogel, a spring in the Kidron Valley located just south of Jerusalem. Some suggest that this stone was named for the
Zoheleth, Stone of
Zoheleth, Stone of. kjv for “Serpent’s Stone” in 1 Kings 1:9.See Serpent’s Stone.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Serpent’s Stone
Serpent’s Stone [Heb. ʾeben hazzōḥeleṯ̱]; AV, NEB, STONE (OF) ZOHELETH zọ̄t’ḥie-leth. A stone beside the spring En-Rogel, where Adonijah held a feast to celebrate his anticipated seizure of the throne (1 K. 1:9). Evidently it was a sacred stone, for springs of moving water were commonly so regarded
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Serpent’s Stone
SERPENT’S STONE* Place where Adonijah, the son of David, sacrificed sheep and oxen and attempted to secretly set himself up as king (1 Kgs 1:9, nlt mg). The serpent’s stone was located near En-rogel, a spring in the Kidron Valley located just south of Jerusalem. Some suggest that this stone was named
Zoheleth, Stone of
ZOHELETH, STONE OF Alternate rendering for “Serpent’s Stone” in 1 Kings 1:9. See Serpent’s Stone.
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Zoheleth
Zoheleth (zoh´huh-lith; Heb., “serpent”), a stone (called in some English Bibles “the Serpent’s Stone”) that was a place of Jebusite worship prior to the capture of that city by David. When David was old and in ill health, his son Adonijah offered sacrifices at the Zoheleth stone prior to having himself
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Zoheleth
ZOHELETH. Evidently a sacred stone (“Serpent’s Stone,” RSV) near En-rogel in the Kidron valley of Jerusalem. Here Adonijah prepared his inaugural celebration when he attempted to succeed David as king (1 Kgs 1:9).
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Serpent’s Stone
SERPENT’S STONE (‘Stone of Zoheleth’, av) (’eḇen hazzōḥeleṯ). A stone near En-rogel, to the SE of Jerusalem, the scene of the slaughtering of animals by Adonijah (1 Ki. 1:9). The meaning of zōḥeleṯ is uncertain, but it is usually connected with zāḥal, ‘to withdraw, crawl away’. From this, some
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Serpent’s Stone
Serpent’s StoneA landmark also rendered “stone of Zoheleth” (Heb. ʾeḇen hazzōḥeleṯ; 1 Kgs. 1:9), apparently a place of Jebusite worship prior to the area’s capture by David. Here Adonijah, Solomon’s rival for David’s throne, was making a sacrifice as he prepared his attempt to usurp the throne. From
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Serpent’s Stone
Serpent’s Stone (Heb. ˒eḇen hazzōḥeleṯ “stone of the creeping animal”).* A place near the spring of En-rogel south of Jerusalem where Adonijah, David’s eldest living son at the time, made ceremonial sacrifices as part of an attempted coup (1 Kgs. 1:9; KJV “stone of Zoheleth”).
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Zoheleth
Zo´heleth (serpent), The stone. This was “by En-rogel,” 1 Kings 1:9; and therefore, if En-rogel be the modern Um-ed-Deraj, this stone, “where Adonijah slew sheep and oxen,” was in all likelihood not far from the well of the Virgin.
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Zoheleth
ZO´HELETH (zōʹhe-leth; “serpent, slippery”). A rocky and dangerous ledge or plateau “beside En-rogel” upon which Adonijah slew oxen and sheep (1 Kings 1:9). It overhangs the Kidron Valley. This has been most satisfactorily identified by M. Clermont Ganneau with the present Arab name Zaḥweilah, a cliff
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