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Semitic Languages
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A subgroup of the Afro-Asiatic (Hamito-Semitic) language family historically spoken by peoples of Mesopotamia, the Levant, Arabia, and Ethiopia. Traditionally associated with the descendants of Shem, father of the Assyrians, Aramaeans, Hebrews, and others (Gen 10:21–31).
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Semitic Languages
Semitic Languages A subgroup of the Afro-Asiatic (Hamito-Semitic) language family historically spoken by peoples of Mesopotamia, the Levant, Arabia, and Ethiopia. Traditionally associated with the descendants of Shem, father of the Assyrians, Aramaeans, Hebrews, and others (Gen 10:21–31).
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Semites, Semitic Languages
Semites, Semitic LanguagesAlthough the word “Semite” does not occur in the biblical materials, we can nonetheless properly speak of the biblical Semites. These people first appear in the Table of Nations (Gen. 10), an early Israelite ethnographic list. The Table conceptualizes Israel’s ancient neighbors
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Shemitic Languages
Shemit´ic Languages, the family of languages spoken by the descendants of Shem, chiefly the Hebrew, Chaldaic, Assyrian, Arabic, Phoenician, and Aramaic or Syriac. The Jews in their earlier history spoke the Hebrew, but in Christ’s time they spoke the Aramaic, sometimes called the Syro-chaldaic.
Compton’s Encyclopedia
Semitic languages
Semitic languagesA language family that covers a broad geographical region and a vast historical period, the Semitic language group is part of an even larger language family known as Afro-Asiatic, or Hamito-Semitic. Such modern languages as Hebrew, Arabic, and Ethiopic belong to the Semitic language
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 3, H–L
Languages of the Ane
languages of the ANE. Those languages of the ANE that have left behind many documents on clay, stone, papyrus, or even parchment are fairly few in number, and are for the most part well known. There were dozens of other languages and dialects spoken by the various nationalities and tribes of this region