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Seleucus I Nicator
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
The founder and first king of a dynasty of Greek-speaking kings that ruled over Syria after the death of Alexander the Great (ca. 321–64 bc). Seleucus was the son of Antiochus, who may have been a general of Philip II of Macedon.One of the distinguished generals of Alexander the Great, Seleucus became a commander of 1,000 men (i.e., a chiliarch) after Alexander’s death in 323 bc. Two years later, he was awarded the satrapy of Babylon (321 bc). But as the successors of Alexander fought for control of the massive empire, Seleucus was forced out of Babylon by Antigonus (316 bc). He fled to Egypt and to the protection of Ptolemy I, who helped him regain Babylon when they defeated Antigonus at Gaza (312 bc).In the years that followed, Seleucus extended his empire to include Media, Susiana, and NW India. In 301 bc, Seleucus gained control of Syria and much of Asia Minor by defeating Antigonus at Ipsus. He established Antioch as a new capital city and avidly promoted Hellenism throughout his empire. His rise to power, which nearly took him to the Macedonian throne, was cut short when he was murdered by an exiled son of Ptolemy.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Seleucus I
Seleucus I Nicator (ca. 358–281 bc). The founder and first king of a dynasty of Greek-speaking kings that ruled over Syria after the death of Alexander the Great (ca. 321–64 bc). Seleucus was the son of Antiochus, who may have been a general of Philip II of Macedon.One of the distinguished generals
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Seleucus (Person)
SELEUCUS (PERSON). Name of the founder of the line of Greek-speaking kings of Syria and adjacent areas after the death of Alexander the Great. Hence the line, which lasted more or less continuously from ca. 321 b.c. to 64 b.c., is known as the Seleucid dynasty, the rulers as the Seleucidae. It is of
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Seleucus
1. Seleucus I Nicator (Conquerer) (312–281 b.c.), a general in the army of Alexander the Great, and one of the Diadochi (Successors) who vied for control of the Macedonian empire following Alexander’s death in 323 b.c. The situation following Alexander’s death is alluded to in Dnl. 8:8, where Seleucus
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Seleucus
Seleucus (Gk. Seleúkos)1. Seleucus I Nicator ([321]312–281 b.c.e.); one of the Diadochi (“Successors”) who divided up Alexander’s empire after his death. A childhood companion of Alexander, he had served Alexander well as chief of his elite body guard. Seleucus I was satrap of Babylon at the time or
Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, Volumes I–III
SELEUCUS I.
SELEUCUS I. (Σέλευκος) surnamed Nicator, king of Syria, and the founder of the Syrian monarchy. He was the son of Antiochus, a Macedonian of distinction among the officers of Philip II., but fabulous stories were in circulation (evidently fabricated after he had attained to greatness), which represented
All the People in the Bible: An A–Z Guide to the Saints, Scoundrels, and Other Characters in Scripture
Seleucus I Nicator (323�281 BCE) (???a�t??, �Victor�)
Seleucus I Nicator (323–281 bce) (Νικάτωρ, “Victor”)When Alexander the Great lay dying in 323 bce, he was asked to name a successor to rule his empire, which spanned most of the known world. He said that he would leave it to whoever was strong enough to take and hold it.After a brief power play among
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
SELEUCUS
SELEUCUS si-loo´kuhs [Σελεύκος Seleukos]. Six kings of the Seleucid dynasty (see SELEUCID EMPIRE) had the name Seleucus, including the founder of the Seleucid dynasty. Of these, four can be considered significant. 1. Seleucus I Nicator (312–281 bce) was one of the Diadochi (“Successors”) who divided