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Sargon
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
(Sharru-kin, “legitimate king”; סַרְגוֹן‎, sargon). King of Assyria from 721–705 bc, who likely finished the siege and plundering of Samaria (2 Kgs 17), which is ascribed by the biblical text to the “king of Assyria.”
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Sargon II
Sargon II (Sharru-kin, “legitimate king”; סַרְגוֹן‎, sargon). King of Assyria from 721–705 bc, who likely finished the siege and plundering of Samaria (2 Kgs 17), which is ascribed by the biblical text to the “king of Assyria.”
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Sargon (Person)
SARGON (PERSON) [Heb sargôn (סַרְגֹּון)]. In Assyrian the name is spelled Šarru-kı̄n and means “legitimate king.” It is clearly a throne name adopted by the king at the time of his accession. Three kings in Mesopotamian history bore this name—Sargon of Akkad (ca. 2334–2279 b.c.), Sargon I of Assyria,
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Sargon
Sargon. Assyrian monarch from 722–705 bc. whose military campaigns are historically well documented. Excavations have revealed his palace at what was probably Nineveh as well as an incompleted palace at Khorsabad. Sargon II bore the name of an illustrious conqueror who lived and fought some 1500 years
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Sargon
Sargon särʹgän [Heb. sargôn (Isa. 20:1); LXX Arna, Symm Sargon; Akk. šarrukîn, “he (the god) has established the kingship”]. The name of at least three kings, Sargon (“the Great”) of Akkad, Sargon (I) of Assyria, and Sargon II of Assyria. Only Sargon II is mentioned in the Scriptures, and he only
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Sargon
SARGON Assyrian monarch from 722–705 bc, whose military campaigns are historically well documented. Excavations have revealed his palace at what was probably Nineveh as well as an incomplete palace at Khorsabad. Sargon II bore the name of an illustrious conqueror who lived and fought some 1,500 years
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Sargon II
Sargon II (sahr´gon; Akkadian, “the king is legitimate”), king of Assyria 722–705 bce. Though mentioned by name only in Isa. 20:1, Sargon II has great significance for biblical history, as he was the king of Assyria responsible for the conquest of Samaria and deportation of Israelites in 720 bce. Sargon
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Sargon
SARGON. With the single exception of Isa 20:1 the name Sargon (Heb. sargôn) was not attested in ancient literature. Because of cuneiform records unearthed since 1843 it is now known that three different Mesopotamian rulers, two of them illustrious in their own way and in their own eras, bore that throne-name
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Sargon
SARGON. Sargon (Heb. sargōn; lxx Arna; Assyr. Sarru-ūkîn, ‘[the god] has established the king-[ship]’) ruled Assyria 722–705 bc. His reign is known in much detail from inscriptions at his palace at Khorsabad built in 717–707 bc, and from historical texts and letters found at Nineveh and Nimrud. Although
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Sargon
Sargon (Heb. sargôn; Akk. Šarru-kēn)Sargon II, king of Assyria (721–705). Although the name Sargon means “the king is legitimate” in Akkadian, Sargon II’s legitimacy to the throne is uncertain. He refers to Tiglath-pileser III (744–727) as his father only once in his inscriptions, and gained the
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Sargon
Sargon [särˊgŏn] (Heb. sarg̱ôn; Akk. Šarru-kēn “tile king is legitimate”).*
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Sargon
SARGON (Assyrian, “legitimate king”) Sargon II, ruler of Assyria from around 722 to 705 b.c. The son of Tiglath-pileser III and the brother of Shalmaneser V, he succeeded the latter and is known chiefly through inscriptions in Khorsabad, Nineveh, and Nimrud. Although only mentioned by name once in the
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Sargon
Sar´gon (prince of the sun), one of the greatest of the Assyrian kings, is mentioned by name but once in Scripture—Isa. 20:1. He was the successor of Shalmaneser, and was Sennacherib’s father and his immediate predecessor. He reigned from b.c. 721 to 702, and seems to have been a usurper. He was undoubtedly
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