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Samaria (city)
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Oholah
Oholah (אָ֒הלָה‎, ohlah). A name meaning “tent-woman” or “woman living in a tent.” Symbolically used by Ezekiel along with “Oholiva” (or Oholibah) to describe Samaria and Judah as prostitutes (Ezek 23:4–5, 36, 44).
Samaria
Samaria (שֹׁמְרוֹן‎, shomeron; Σαμάρεια, Samareia). In the Bible, “Samaria” refers to both a city and a geographic region within the Central Highlands (compare 1 Kgs 16:24). The city sits over 400 feet above sea level, and offered easy access to major travel routes and the Jezreel Valley, particularly
Samaria, Fall of
Samaria, Fall of (שֹׁמְרוֹן‎, shomeron; Σαμάρεια, Samareia). Explores the events surrounding the fall of the capital of the northern kingdom of Israel to Assyria.
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Samaria (Place)
SAMARIA (PLACE) [Heb šōmrôn (שֹׁמְרֹון)]. The place name “Samaria” has a twofold sense. First, it refers to the capital city of the N kingdom of Israel, from the time of its construction by Omri in the early 9th century b.c. (1 Kgs 16:23–24) to its conquest by the Assyrians in the late 8th century
Shemer (Person)
SHEMER (PERSON) [Heb šemer (שֶׁמֶר)]. Var. SHOMER. 1. The original owner of the hill upon which Samaria was built and after which the city was named (1 Kgs 16:24). Gray (1 and 2 Kings OTL, 367) suggested that Shemer was the name of a tribe or clan since the hill was quite large and fertile and the name
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Aholah
Aholah. kjv form of Oholah, the symbolic name for Samaria, capital of the northern kingdom of Israel, in Ezekiel 23.See Oholah, Oholibah.
Oholah, Oholibah
Oholah, Oholibah. Names given to the northern kingdom (kjv Aholah), with its capital at Samaria, and to the southern kingdom (kjv Aholibah), with its capital at Jerusalem, respectively, by Ezekiel in his allegory depicting the unfaithfulness of God’s people (ch 23). The daughters of one woman, Israel,
Samaria
Samaria. Capital of the northern kingdom of Israel, identified with the hill on which the village of Sebastieh is located.The hill was purchased by Omri from Shemer, the clan who had occupied it. He built his new capital there (1 Kgs 16:24). A village was evidently there dating at least from the 10th
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Gilgal (of Samaria)
2. The Gilgal of Elijah and Elisha has been identified by some scholars with 1; but the description of the journey of these prophets to Transjordan by way of Bethel and Jericho (2 K. 2:1–8) suggests the existence of another Gilgal in the hill country above Bethel. Today a Jiljûlieh does exist, about
Oholah
Oholah ōhślä [Heb ʾoho]; AV AHOLAH. A symbolic name for Samaria. Ezk. 23 presents an allegory in which Samaria (“Oholah”) and Jerusalem (“Oholibah”), i.e., the northern and southern kingdoms, respectively, are sisters married to the Lord, but faithless to Him from the beginning of their relationship.
Samaria
Samaria sə-mârʹē-ə [Heb. šōmerôn; Aram šāmerayin (Ezr. 4:10, 17); Gk. Samareia, Somorōn (Ezra); other forms in 1 K. 16:24 only].
Samaria
1. A residence of the rulers of Israel during the divided kingdom. It is mentioned 190 times in the OT and frequently in Assyrian records (as “Samerina”) and Aramaic, Greek, and Latin literature.The oldest excavated remains of Samaria, located on a hill about 68 km (42 mi) N of Jerusalem, are Early
Samaria
Samaria sə-mârʹē-ə, COUNTRY OF [Heb. šōmerôn; Aram šāmerayin, Akk. Samerina; Gk. Samareia; traditionally derived from the tribe or clan name Shemer, but more likely from šōmēr, “watchman”; cf. Isa. 21:11]. A region in Palestine located between Galilee (N) and Judah/Judea (S) and between
Shemer
1. The original owner of the hill on which Omri built the city of Samaria. According to 1 K. 16:24 the city’s name (Heb. šōmerôn) is derived from “Shemer.” Shemer may be the name of an individual but more likely represents the name of a clan (see J. Gray, I & II Kings [OTL, 2nd ed 1970], p. 367).
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Aholah
AHOLAH* kjv form of Oholah, the symbolic name for Samaria, capital of the northern kingdom of Israel, in Ezekiel 23. See Oholah and Oholibah.
Oholah and Oholibah
OHOLAH AND OHOLIBAH Names given to the northern kingdom (kjv “Aholah”), with its capital at Samaria, and to the southern kingdom (kjv “Aholibah”), with its capital at Jerusalem, respectively, by Ezekiel in his allegory depicting the unfaithfulness of God’s people (Ez 23). The names characterized the
Samaria
SAMARIA Capital of the northern kingdom of Israel, identified with the hill on which the village of Sebastieh is located.The hill was purchased by King Omri from Shemer, the clan who had occupied it. He built his new capital there (1 Kgs 16:24). A village was evidently there, dating at least from the
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Oholah, Oholibah
Oholah (oh-hoh´luh; Heb., “she of the tent”), Oholibah (oh-hohl´i-bah; “my tent is in her”), the names of the allegorical sisters spoken of in Ezek. 23; Oholah represents Samaria and Oholibah represents Jerusalem. After a youth of prostitution with the Egyptians, Oholah turned her lust upon the Assyrians
Samaria, City Of
Samaria (suh-mair´ee-uh), city of, the capital of the northern kingdom, Israel, for the greater part of the history of that independent state. Omri built the city in the early ninth century bce and moved his administrative center there from Tirzah (1 Kings 16:24). It remained the capital until the demise
Shemer
Shemer (shee´muhr; Heb., perhaps “watch”).1 The owner of the hill Omri bought and used for his capital city Samaria (1 Kings 16:24).2 The father of Bani in the lineage of temple musicians (1 Chron. 6:46).3 An Asherite; he was the son of Heber and the father of four sons (1 Chron. 7:34; “Shomer,” 7:32).
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Aholah
AHOLAH. A symbolic name (hinting at Israel’s schismatic tent-shrine) used in Ezk 23 for the kingdom of Samaria. The unfaithfulness of Israel and Judah was symbolically portrayed in the persons of Aholah and Aholibah (Oholah and Oholibah in RSV), who became harlots while married to the Lord. Aholah’s
Samaria
Ruins of the gate of Samaria with a Hellenistic round tower at left. HFVSAMARIA1. The city—founded c. 880 b.c. by Omri, king of Israel. It remained the capital of the northern kingdom until its fall in 722/21 b.c. After reigning for six years at Tirzah (c. six miles NNE of Shechem), Omri purchased
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Oholibamah, Oholah, Oholibah
OHOLIBAMAH, OHOLAH, OHOLIBAH. Oholibamah was an Edomite name used for both men and women. It was the name of *Esau‘s second wife, a Canaanite woman, daughter of Anah and mother of Jeush, Jalam and Korah (Gn. 36:1–28). There was also an Edomite chief of this name (Gn. 36:41; 1 Ch. 1:52) which means ‘tent
Samaria
SAMARIA. The name of the N Israelite capital and of the territory surrounding it.
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Gilgal
Gilgal (Heb. gilgāl)1. A place “opposite” Mts. Gerizim and Ebal. Deut. 11:30 describes it as both “in the land of” the Canaanites dwelling in the Arabah (which could refer to Gilgal near Jericho) and “beside” the oaks of Moreh (which would indicate another Gilgal near Shechem).2. A place E of Jericho
Oholah
Oholah (Heb. ʾoh[lâ), OHOLIBAH (ʾoh[lɩ̂ḇâ)The names given in Ezek. 23 to two sisters, the personified cities of Samaria and Jerusalem, respectively. In a metaphor that draws heavily on Jer. 3:6–11; Ezek. 16, the capital cities are represented as Yahweh’s wives, and their various international liaisons
Shemer
Shemer (Heb. šemer) (also SHOMER)1. Owner of the hill that Omri purchased for the site of Samaria (1 Kgs. 16:24).2. A Merarite Levite, son of Mahli (1 Chr. 6:46 [MT 31]).3. An Asherite (1 Chr. 7:34), called Shomer at v. 32.
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Oholah
Oholah [ō hōˊlə] (Heb. ˒ōho “she who has a tent” or “her tent”). The elder of two sisters in the allegory of Ezek. 23 (KJV “Aholab”), representing Samaria. Both sisters were promiscuous (i.e., idolatrous), plying their trade as a prostitutes first in Egypt and afterward with the Assyrians (vv.
Samaria
Samaria [sə mârˊĭ ə] (Heb. šōmrôn; Aram. šāmerāyin; Gk. Samareia). The capital city of Israel, the northern kingdom.Samaria was established as Israel’s capital on a hill purchased by King Omri from Shemer (1 Kgs. 16:24). The ruins of the city are at modern Sebastiyeh, ca. 9 km. (5.6
The Archaeological Encyclopedia of the Holy Land
Samaria, Shomron
SAMARIA, SHOMRON Samaria, biblical Shomron in Hebrew, was the capital of the ancient kingdom of Israel. Built on a hill about 300 feet above the surrounding fertile agricultural area, the city occupies a strategic point that gives access in three directions: in the west to the coastal plain; in the east
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Samaria
SAMARIA, SAMARITANS Samaria was the capital city of the northern kingdom of Israel under the Omride Dynasty in the early ninth century b.c. (1 Kgs 16:23–24) until the city was conquered by the Assyrians around 722 b.c. The city of Samaria is normally identified with the modern Sebastiya (Sebaste). The
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