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Salamis
A seaport on the eastern shore of Cyprus where Barnabas and Saul landed on their first missionary journey (Ac 13:5).
Dictionaries
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Salamis (Place)
SALAMIS (PLACE) [Gk Salamis (Σαλαμις)]. An important commercial city on the E shore of the island of Cyprus (35°10´N; 33°55´E). It is often confused with a Greek island of the same name, which is near Athens. Even though Paphos was the capital in the NT era, Salamis was still arguably the most important
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Salamis
Salamis. Seaport on the eastern shore of Cyprus where Barnabas and Saul landed near the beginning of their first missionary journey. Here they “proclaimed the word of God in the synagogues of the Jews” (Acts 13:5). Tradition states that the city was 1000 years old when the missionaries arrived, having
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Salamis
Salamis salʹə-mis [Gk. Salamis]. A city on the eastern coast of the island of Cyprus, S of the Karpass Peninsula (the long tongue of Cyprus that stretches out to the northeast) and just N of the modern port of Famagusta. Salamis is sometimes confused with the Greek island of the same name, which is
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Salamis
SALAMIS Seaport on the eastern shore of Cyprus where Barnabas and Saul landed near the beginning of their first missionary journey. They proclaimed the word of God in the synagogues of the Jews in this town (Acts 13:5). Tradition states that the city was 1,000 years old when the missionaries arrived,
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Salamis
Salamis (sal´uh-mis), a city on the eastern coast of Cyprus, which, according to Greek mythology, was founded at the end of the Trojan War. Named after the island of Salamis, the city developed around an excellent natural harbor, becoming the main port of Cyprus and a commercial center for the Roman
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Salamis
The forum at SalamisSALAMIS. The greatest port and commercial center of Cyprus (q.v.) when Paul and Barnabas landed there on their first missionary journey (Acts 13:5). The city is commonly assumed to be the home of Barnabas. Numerous destructions and rebuildings plus partial excavation make it difficult
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Salamis
SALAMIS. A town on the E coast of the central plain of *Cyprus, not to be confused with the famous island off the coast of Attica. It rivalled in importance Paphos, the Roman capital of the whole island, and eventually superseded it. The harbour which made Salamis a great commercial centre is now completely
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Salamis
Salamis (Gk. Salamɩ́s)A major port city on the eastern coast of Cyprus, 5 km. (3 mi.) N of Famagusta near modern Seryios. According to tradition, Salamis was founded by Teucer after the Trojan War. The town possessed a good harbor and was the chief city of Cyprus through the Roman period, even though
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Salamis
Salamis [sălˊə mĭs] (Gk. Salamis; cf. Sem. šlm “peace”).† A port city, now a ruin, on the Famagusta Bay of eastern Cyprus, 5 km. (3 mi.) north of Famagusta near modern Seryios. According to ancient tradition founded following the Trojan War, Salamis is named in a seventh-century B.C. tribute
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Salamis
SALAMIS The largest city and port on the Mediterranean island of Cyprus, not to be confused with the Greek island of the same name. The book of Acts and Josephus (Ant. 13.284–87) attest to the presence of a Jewish population there in New Testament times. Salamis was the first stop for Paul and Barnabas
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Salamis
Sal´amis (salt), a city at the east end of the island of Cyprus, and the first place visited by Paul and Barnabas, on the first missionary journey, after leaving the mainland at Seleucia. Here alone, among all the Greek cities visited by St. Paul, we read expressly of “synagogues” in the plural, Acts
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Salamis
SAL´AMIS (salʹa-mis). A city at the E extremity of the island of Cyprus, and the first place visited by Paul and Barnabas after leaving the mainland at Selucia (Acts 13:5). From the use of “synagogues” in the plural it may be inferred that there were many Jews in the city. And it is probable that from