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Sacred pillar
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A bas-relief sculpture that commemorates the military exploits of Assyrian King Shalmaneser III (r. 858–824 bc) during the first 31 years of his reign. The obelisk features five rows of reliefs that depict five subdued kings bringing tribute to Shalmaneser, one of whom is widely believed to be Jehu of Israel (reigned 841–814 bc). However, McCarter has argued that it is more likely Jehoram (see McCarter, “Yaw, Son of Omri”).Jehu is shown on his hands and knees before Shalmaneser and is referred to as “Jehu (Ia-ú-a), son of Omri.” The text says that Shalmaneser received from him “silver, gold, a golden saplu-bowl, a golden vase with pointed bottom, golden tumblers, golden buckets, tin, a staff for a king, and a wooden puruhtu” (ANET, 281). His tribute is dated around 841 bc.The obelisk was created from black limestone in Calah (the modern city of Nimrud) and erected in 825 bc. It was discovered there in 1846 and is now housed in the British Museum.For more on the relationship between Israel and Assyria, see this article: Palestine, Administration of, Neo-Assyrian.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Black Obelisk
Black Obelisk A bas-relief sculpture that commemorates the military exploits of Assyrian King Shalmaneser III (r. 858–824 bc) during the first 31 years of his reign. The obelisk features five rows of reliefs that depict five subdued kings bringing tribute to Shalmaneser, one of whom is widely believed
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Sacred Stone
SACRED STONE. The “sacred stone which fell from the sky” (Acts 19:35) was an object of worship in the temple of Artemis at Ephesus. The Greek is one word, diopetēs, lit. “fallen from the sky,” and the meaning of the passage is therefore somewhat obscure. It probably refers to a meteorite to which the
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Obelisk
Obelisk obʹə-lisk [Heb maṣṣēḇâ—‘pillar’] AV IMAGE; NEB SACRED PILLAR. Jeremiah 43:13 predicts Nebuchadrezzar’s invasion of Egypt, prophesying that he will break the maṣṣeḇôṯ of Beth-shemesh, which is in the land of Egypt. The Heb maṣṣeḇôṯ is appropriately rendered “obelisks” here (so
Pillar
Pillar [Heb. maṣṣēḇâ] (Gen. 28:18, 22; 31:13, 45, 51f.; 35:14, 20; Ex. 23:24; 24:4; 34:13; Dt. 7:5; 12:3; 16:22; etc); AV also IMAGE, GARRISON (Ezk. 26:11); NEB also SACRED PILLAR; [ʿammûḏ] (Ex. 13:21f.; 14:19, 24; 26:32, 37; 27:10ff.; 33:9f.; 35:11, 17; 36:36, 38; 38:10ff.; Nu. 3:36f.; etc.);
Sacred Stone
Sacred Stone Greek diopeté̄s (lit “fallen from heaven”; see Bauer, rev, p. 199) is rendered by the RSV “sacred stone that fell from the sky” (cf. AV “image which fell down from Jupiter”; NEB “symbol … which fell from heaven”). It probably denotes a meteorite that was worshiped as an image of Artemis.
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Black Obelisk
BLACK OBELISK* Shaft of black limestone describing the military successes of Shalmaneser III of Assyria (858–824 bc) during the first 31 years of his reign. Six and a half feet (2 meters) high, smoothed off on its four sides, the obelisk has five rows of bas-reliefs extending around it with inscriptions
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Obelisk
obelisk, a four-sided free-standing pillar, normally monolithic, tapering inward as it rises, terminating in a small pyramid. Obelisks were produced in Egypt from at least the latter part of the Old Kingdom (Fifth Dynasty, late third millennium bce) until the Ptolemaic period (late fourth century bce).
Pillars
pillars1 Vertical columns of wood or stone used as architectural members to hold up roof supports, whether in temples (1 Kings 7; Judg. 16:25–29), palaces (Esther 1:6), or houses, as archaeological evidence abundantly shows. They were set on firm bases or in sockets for stability and were capped by
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Pillar
PILLAR. The designation of gravestones, memorials, columns, altars, and formations of cloud, smoke, or fire.1. Heb. ˒ōmnôt. “pillars” (better, “supports”) at temple doors, overlaid with gold which Hezekiah stripped off for the enemy (2 Kgs 18:16), probably the door frames. Emphasis is on function.
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Obelisk
ObeliskA sacred monument native to ancient Egypt in the shape of a tall, four-sided pillar that rises to a pyramidal point. Built of stone, its four sides were usually covered in royal or religious inscriptions. Numerous examples of obelisks survive to this day in Egypt.In the only biblical reference
Pillar
PillarA standing stone (Heb. maṣṣēḇâ) erected as a memorial or an object of worship. During the period of the patriarchs, stones were set up as memorials (Gen. 28:18; 31:45–52; 35:14, 20; Exod. 24:4; 2 Sam. 18:18), sometimes representing God’s dwelling (Gen. 28:22). Sometimes translated as “image” (KJV),
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Obelisk
Obelisk [ōˊbə lĭsk] (Heb. maṣṣēḇâ “pillar, standing stone, image”). A monument shaped like a fourcornered pillar that rises to a pyramidal point. The sides are often covered by inscriptions commemorating the actions of a god or king.Such monuments may have originated in the Egyptian city of
Pillar
Pillar. (Heb. maṣṣēḇâ (KJV sometime; “image”) is used of stones set up as memorials, usually during the era of the patriarchs (Gen. 28:18; 31:45–52; 35:14, 20; Exod. 24:4; 2 Sam. 18:18). Such memorial stones might be intended to represent God’s dwelling (Gen. 28:22). The places where they were
Sacred Stone
Sacred Stone (Gk. diopetḗs).* An object preserved in the temple of Artemis in Ephesus (Acts 19:35; RSV “the sacred stone that fell from the sky”; KJV “the image that fell down from Jupiter”). The Greek adjective, which here occurs substantively, often was used to designate meteorites regarded
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Pillar
Pillar. The notion of a pillar is of a shaft or isolated pile, either supporting or not supporting a roof. But perhaps the earliest application of the pillar was the votive or monumental. This in early times consisted of nothing but a single stone or pile of stones. Gen. 28:18; 31:46, etc. The stone
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Pillar
PILLAR. The rendering of nine Heb. words and one Gk. word.1. The essential notion of a pillar is of a shaft or isolated pile either supporting or not supporting a roof. Pillars form an important feature in oriental architecture, partly, perhaps, as a reminiscence of the tent with its supporting poles,
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Pillar
Pillarused to support a building (Judg. 16:26, 29); as a trophy or memorial (Gen. 28:18; 35:20; Ex. 24:4; 1 Sam. 15:12, A.V., “place,” more correctly “monument,” or “trophy of victory,” as in 2 Sam. 18:18); of fire, by which the Divine Presence was manifested (Ex. 13:2). The “plain of the pillar” in