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Road
Geographical objects and features
Dictionaries
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Roads and Highways
ROADS AND HIGHWAYS. This entry consists of two articles that survey the ancient road systems that ran through Palestine and that connected Palestine to the larger world of the ANE. The first article covers the pre-Roman period, while the second covers the road system of the Roman period. See also LIMES,
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Causeway
Causeway This term occurs in the AV as a translation of Heb. mesillâ (built-up road) in 1 Ch. 26:16, 18.See Roads.
Concourse
Concourse The AV for Heb. hāmâ in Prov. 1:21 (“in the chief place of concourse,” Heb. berō’š hōmîyôṯ) and for Gk. systrophḗ in Acts 19:40. In the OT passage the NEB has “at the top of the busy street.” The RSV, following the LXX, emends to ḥōmôṯ, “walls,” and reads “on the top of the
Path
Path [Heb. ʾōraḥ, neṯîḇâ, nāṯîḇ, maʿg̱āl, mišʿôl (“narrow path,” Nu. 22:24), šeḇîl (Ps. 77:19 [MT 20]), mesillâ (Joel 2:8), alaqlaq (“slippery path,” Jer. 23:12), dereḵ (Jer. 31:9), tāmaḵ (“follow the path,” Prov. 5:5); Gk. hodós, tríbos, trochía]; AV also WAY, LAND (following
Street
Street The most common OT term for “street” is Heb. ḥûṣ, which basically means “outside” (cf. the frequent LXX rendering, éxō or éxōthen). This term reflects the situation in most ancient cities, where the street was simply the place left outside of (i.e., between) the buildings.The next most
Way
Way This common English word is used by the RSV over 550 times in the singular and about two hundred times in the plural. In the OT it usually represents Heb. dereḵ, but occasionally it translates ʾōraḥ (e.g., Job 16:22; 19:8; Ps. 44:18 [MT 19]; Isa. 26:7). In a few instances “way” represents another
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Path
PATH A worn track or road. “Path(s)” and “pathway(s)” are used to translate a variety of words used in the Bible: (1) a well-trodden and much-used roadway (Gn 49:17; Pss 16:11; 139:3; Prv 2:8, 19); (2) a thoroughfare or highway (Is 59:7; Jl 2:8); (3) a beaten track as across fields, over hills, and through
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Way
way.1 A path, road, or journey.2 A natural pattern of behavior observed in the world. Prov. 30:19 refers to “the way of an eagle in the sky, the way of a snake on a rock, the way of a ship on the high seas, and the way of a man with a girl.”3 God’s commandments or expectation of humanity; i.e., the
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Road
ROAD. Roads tied the ancient biblical cities together for purposes of trade. When empires arose, these trade routes became the primary concern of kings for the stability of their governments. Roads served the needs of commerce, the military, and the pilgrim. Jerusalem, Damascus, Haran, Babylon, and other
Causeway
CAUSEWAY. This word occurs in 1 Chr 26:16, 18, and refers to a series or flight of steps leading up into the temple.
Highway
HIGHWAYA travel route for public use. The most frequent Heb. term used in msillâ (Num 20:19; Isa 7:3; 40:3; et al.), which means a built-up roadway. In the NT the Gr. term hodos is translated “highway” three times by the KJV (Mt 22:10; Mk 10:46; Lk 14:23) and once by the RSV (Lk 14:23). See Commerce;
Path
PATH. In addition to the literal use (Gen 49:17), the word is frequently employed in a figurative sense. (1) With reference to God’s ways of dealing with men (Ps 25:10; Mt 3:3) and God’s standards for worship and conduct (Ps 25:4). (2) With reference to man’s ethical conduct (Prov 4:18; Heb 12:13) and
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Way
WAY. 1. OT usage. Apart from the obvious literal uses, there are a number of closely linked metaphorical ones. They derive from the fact that one on a public path becomes known and his goal and purposes are revealed by the road he takes. Most important is the sense of God’s purposes and will, e.g. Ex.
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Roads
RoadsRoads and streets during the OT period were generally two or more lanes in width (at least 3–4 m. [10–13 ft.]), wide enough to accommodate the traffic of chariots, carts, and wagons. During the Roman period roads ranged from two to five lanes in width. Until Roman times roads were generally unpaved,
Highway
HighwayA generally lengthy and well-maintained thoroughfare (Heb. mĕsillâ), in contrast to a “way” (dereḵ, šĕḇɩ̂l), which can range from a beaten path to a small road. References to highways in the OT include the route taken by the cows transporting the ark toward Beth-shemesh (1 Sam. 6:12) and
Street
StreetGenerally an urban road, usually of dirt, but the Greek and Hebrew words normally translated as “street” can also mean “market” or “bazaar.” The OT era saw the emergence of streets as we know them. Prior to that time, ancient Near Eastern cities simply had open spaces between buildings. In NT
Way
WayIn the concrete sense, a road (Deut. 1:2; Ruth 1:7) or a movement along a particular path, i.e., a journey (Exod. 13:21; 1 Kgs. 19:4). However, Heb. dereḵ was also employed more broadly. To walk in the ways of God meant to live according to his will and commandments (Deut. 10:12–13; 1 Kgs. 3:14).
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Highway
Highway (Heb. mesillâ). † As a land bridge between Asia and Africa situated between the Mediterranean Sea and the Syrian desert, Palestine supported a network of highways and lesser roads which peoples from the Hittites to the Romans utilized for trade and military purposes. Paved highways only
Way
Way (Heb. dereḵ; Gk. hodós).† Literally a path, road, or journey. Several such routes are named in the Old Testament. The Way of the Red Sea (Exod. 13:18) refers to the route of the Exodus. The Way of the Land of the Philistines (v. 17) was the Egyptian “Way of Horus,” the ancient military
The Archaeological Encyclopedia of the Holy Land
Roads
ROADS Many terms are used in the Hebrew Bible to refer to roads. Some are merely synonyms, while others distinguish particular types of road. Thus there are references to a highway in 2 Samuel (20:12–13) and in Isaiah (62:10), where the text specifies a road cleared of stones, with signposts to direct
Dictionary of Deities and Demons in the Bible
Way
WAY דרךI. The swearing formula ḥy drk bʾr šbʿ (“As the way of Beersheba lives”, RSV), occurring in Am 8:14, has caused problems to the interpreters ever since antiquity (Barstad 1984:191–201; Olyan 1991:121–127). The main problem with this text concerns the rendering of drk with ‘way’, ‘road’. Even
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Way
WAY The term “way” is used in several senses in Scripture, reaching a culmination point in Christ, who is “the way, and the truth, and the life” (John 14:6).I. In the Old TestamentA. The “Way” as a Way of LifeB. The Way of the Lord and the Way of the WickedII. In the New TestamentA. The Two Ways
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Road
Road. This word occurs but once in the Authorized Version of the Bible, viz., in 1 Sam. 27:10, where it is used in the sense of “raid” or “inroad.” Where a travelled road is meant “path” or “way” is used, since the eastern roads are more like our paths.
Highways
Highways. Though during the sway of the Romans over Palestine they made a few substantial roads for their carts and chariots, yet for the most of the time, as today, the Jews had nothing such as we call roads, but only footpaths through which animals walk in single file. These are never cared for; no
Street
Street. The streets of a modern Oriental town present a great contrast to those with which we are familiar, being generally narrow, tortuous, and gloomy, even in the best towns. Their character is mainly fixed by the climate and the style of architecture, the narrowness being due to the extreme heat,
See also
Topics & Themes