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Rabshakeh
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Rabshakeh
Rabshakeh (רַב־שָׁקֵה‎, rav-shaqeh). The name or title of the Assyrian official who demanded that Hezekiah surrender to Assyria (2 Kgs 18:17–37; 19:4–8; Isa 36:2–22; 37:4–8).
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Rabshakeh
RABSHAKEH [Heb rab-šaqēh (רַב־שַׁקֵה)]. The title of a high-ranking Assyrian official; the word literally means “chief cupbearer.” As a leading Assyrian military officer, the rabshakeh played a prominent role, together with the rabsaris and the tartan, in the siege of Jerusalem led by Sennacherib (2
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Rabshakeh
Rabshakeh. High Assyrian official, originally a cupbearer or chamberlain, but later a powerful palace official. The Rabshakeh was the emissary of Sennacherib, who insultingly demanded that Hezekiah and Jerusalem abandon their reliance on both Egypt and God and surrender to Assyria. Hezekiah refused;
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Rabshakeh
Rabshakeh rabʹshə-kə, rab-shāʹkə [Heb. raḇ-šāqēh]; NEB “chief officer.” The title of a high Assyrian official. He came to Jerusalem from Sennacherib at Lachish with two other high officials (the Tartan and the Rabsaris) to demand the surrender of Judah in 701 b.c. (2 K. 18:17, 19, 26–28, 37; 19:4–8;
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Rabshakeh
RABSHAKEH* High Assyrian official, originally a cupbearer or chamberlain, but later a powerful palace official. The rabshakeh was the emissary of Sennacherib, who insultingly demanded that Hezekiah and Jerusalem abandon their reliance on both Egypt and God and surrender to Assyria. Hezekiah refused;
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Rabshakeh
Rabshakeh (rab´shuh-kuh), one of the emissaries sent by the Assyrian king Sennacherib (705–681 bce) to Hezekiah, the king of Judah (ca. 715–687/6 bce), with a demand for a ransom, which Hezekiah paid out of the temple treasury. When an additional demand for surrender was relayed by Rabshakeh, the prophet
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Rabshakeh
RABSHAKEH. (Heb. răb-shâqēh). The title of the Assyrian officer who was spokesman for the group Sennacherib sent to demand that Hezekiah surrender Jerusalem (2 Kgs 18:17–19:8; Isa 36:2–37:8; see RSV). He systematically but unsuccessfully derided all the defenders’ hopes of deliverance. The KJV and
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Rabshakeh
RABSHAKEH. The title of the Assyr. official who, with the *Tartan and *Rabsaris, was sent by Sennacherib, king of Assyria, from Lachish to demand the surrender of Jerusalem by Hezekiah (2 Ki. 18:17, 19, 26–28, 37; 19:4–8; Is. 36:2, 4, 11–13, 22; 37:4, 8). He acted as spokesman for the delegation, addressing
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Rabshakeh
Rabshakeh (Heb. rab-šāqēh)Title of an Assyrian official, well attested in Akkadian literature (rab shāqē, lit., “chief cupbearer”). Though the office of cupbearer is attested in its literal sense in Akkadian, the title denotes a high ranking governmental official. In eponym lists, this title usually
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Rabshakeh
Rabshakeh [răbˊshə kə] (Heb. rab-šāqēh; Akk. rab šāqū).† A title for an important official in the Assyrian government. While “chief cupbearer” is the literal meaning of the term, it is evident from 2 Kgs. 18:17–19:8 (par. Isa. 36:2–37:8) and from Assyrian records that it came to be the
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Rabshakeh
RABSHAKEH The title of an Assyrian official. The Hebrew word is derived from the Assyrian for “chief cupbearer.” The Rabshakeh, with the Rabsaris and the Tartan, was sent by Sennacherib to meet with Hezekiah and demand the surrender of Jerusalem (2 Kgs 18:17–37; 24:3). (See also Rabsaris and Tartan.)
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Rabshakeh
Rab´shakeh (chief cupbearer), 2 Kings 18, 19; Isa. 36, 37, one of the officers of the king of Assyria sent against Jerusalem in the reign of Hezekiah. [Hezekiah.] (b.c. 713.) The English version takes Rabshakeh as the name of a person; but it is more probably the name of the office which he held at the