Loading…

Looking to help your church and family stay connected to the Word while social distancing?
Check out our free church library, church online resources, and family resources.

Priestly robe
Religious Objects
Dictionaries
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Fisher’s Coat
Fisher’s Coat This expression is found in the AV of Jn. 21:7 where the RSV has “clothes” and the NEB “coat.” John here, after representing Peter as “naked” (Gk. gymnós), pictures him as girding on his “coat” (ependýtēs), literally “outer garment,” and not specifically a “fisher’s coat.” See Coat;
Robe
Robe [Heb. meʿîl, kuttōneṯ (Gen. 37:3, 23, 31f.; 2 S. 13:18f.; Isa. 22:21), leḇûš (Est. 6:8–11; 8:15; Ps. 45:13 [MT 14]), beg̱eḏ (1 K. 22:10, 30; 2 Ch. 18:9, 29; Ps. 45:8 [MT 9]), ʾeḏer (Mic. 2:8), ʾaddereṯ (Jonah 3:6), riqmâ (Ps. 45:13 [MT 14]), middâ (Ps. 133:2), maḥalâṣâ (Isa. 3:22),
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Stomacher
An ancient stone cup for watering sheep and goats at the well of Abraham in the Plains of Mamre. HFVSTOMACHER. The KJV term for the decorative covering worn on the upper front part of the body. The RSV calls it. “rich robe” (Isa 3:24).
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Stomacher
STOMACHER. The somewhat misleading av translation of Heb. peṯîḡîl, a word of uncertain meaning which occurs only in Is. 3:24 as an antithesis for ‘a girding of sackcloth’. rsv ‘a rich robe’ seems to fit this requirement.J. D. Douglas.
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Robe
Robe. †A reading used in English versions to represent a number of words (including Heb. me˓îl, keṯōneṯ, beg̱eḏ, ˒eḏer, ˒addereṯ, middab; Gk. stolḗ, himátion, esthḗs), generally for the main garment or an outer garment worn by a man or a woman, rich or poor, as a garment only for ceremonial
Stomacher
Stomacher. The KJV rendering of Heb. peṯîgîl (Isa. 3:24). RSV “rich robe” is more likely to be correct and better suits the contrast with “a girding with sackcloth.”
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Stomacher
Stomacher. The Hebrew word so translated, Isa. 3:24, describes some article of female attire, the character of which is a mere matter of conjecture.
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Stomacher
Stomacher(Isa. 3:24), an article of female attire, probably some sort of girdle around the breast.
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
FISHER'S COAT
FISHER’S COAT<kot>: This expression is found in Jn 21:7 where the Revised Version (British and American) and the American Standard Revised Version have “coat.” John here, after representing Peter as “naked” ([γυμνός, gumnos]), pictures him as girding on his “coat” ([ἐπενδύτης, ependutes]),
STOMACHER
STOMACHER<stum’-uk-er>: Used to translate [פְּתִיגִיל‎, pethighil] (Isa 3:24 the King James Version), where the meaning is uncertain. The English word denotes that part of a woman’s dress which covered the breast and the pit of the stomach. It was usually much ornamented.
The Westminster Bible Dictionary
Stomacher
Stomʹa-cher. The Hebrew word so translated in Isa. 3:24 describes some article of female attire, the character of which is a matter of conjecture—perhaps a festive outer robe.
Pocket Dictionary of Liturgy & Worship
Robe
robe. A long, flowing ecclesiastical garment rooted in antiquity, varying in *color. Ceremonially important (1) in antiquity as the white garment of the *baptized, and (2) as the distinguishing clothing of those leading the liturgy (e.g., *ministers and *choir members). The liturgical importance reaches
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 5, Q–Z
Robe
robe A long loose outer garment, usually elegant and rich in texture, color, and style. A robe is therefore the dress of royalty and stately rank, ecclesiastical eminence, and social distinction. The primary term in Hebrew is mĕʿîl H5077, used for example of the robes worn by King Saul (1 Sam. 24:11)
Stomacher
stomacher. This English term, referring to the front part of a bodice, is used by the KJV as the rendering of Hebrew pĕtîgîl H7345, which occurs only once (Isa. 3:24). The etymology of the Hebrew word is unknown and its meaning is uncertain. Because it stands in contrast to śaq H8566 (see sackcloth),
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Fisher’s Coat
FISHER’S COAT,, kōt: This expression is found in Jn 21:7 where RV and ARV have “coat.” John here, after representing Peter as “naked” (γυμνός, gumnós), pictures him as girding on his “coat” (ἐπενδύτης, ependútēs), lit. “upper garment,” and not at all specifically a “fisher’s coat.” See Dress; Upper
Stomacher
STOMACHER, stumʹuk-ẽr: Used to translate פְּתִיגִיל‎, pethīghīl (Isa 3:24 AV), where the meaning is uncertain. The Eng. word denotes that part of a woman’s dress which covered the breast and the pit of the stomach. It was usually much ornamented.
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
ROBE
ROBE [כְּתֹנֶתkethoneth, מְעִילmeʿil; ἔνδυμα endyma, ἐσθής esthēs, ἱμάτιον himation, ποδήρης podērēs, στολή stolē, χλαμύς chlamys]. The robe is an outer garment that is worn over a tunic or inner garment. It may be as simple as a rectangular piece of fabric or it may be cut and sewn. The