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Priestly miter
Religious Objects
Dictionaries
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Mitre
Mitre. kjv translation for turban, a kind of headdress worn by the high priest of Israel, in Exodus 28:4.See Priests and Levites.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Tire
Tire A term used several times by the AV to designate a woman’s hair ornamentation or headband. In Isa. 3:18, AV, “round tires like the moon” renders Heb. śaharōnîm (see Crescent); and in the AV of Ezk. 24:17, 23, “tire” represents Heb. peʾēr (RSV “turban”). In 2 K. 9:30, AV, the verb “tire”
Turban
Turban [Heb. miṣnep̱eṯ, also ṣānîp̱, (Isa. 3:23), peʾēr (Ezk. 24:17, 23; 44:18), teḇûlîm (Ezk. 23:15)]; AV MITRE, TIRE, BONNET, DIADEM (Job 29:14; Ezk. 21:26), HOODS (Isa. 3:23), “dyed attire” (Ezk. 23:15); NEB also DIADEM (Ezk. 21:26).The OT mentions a variety of headgear. The high priest
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Mitre
MITRE* kjv translation for turban, a kind of headdress, worn by the high priest of Israel, in Exodus 28:4. See Priests and Levites.
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Turban
turban, a cloth draped, wrapped, or wound around the head to give protection or distinctive appearance. The turban functioned as a priestly garment (Exod. 28:4, 37, 39; 29:6; 39:28, 31; Lev. 8:9; 16:4) for Aaron and carried the golden plaque inscribed “Holy to the Lord” (Exod. 28:36–37). Job saw his
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Headband
HEADBAND1. KJV translation for bands or sashes around the waist (Isa 3:20). The same word (qishshurɩ̂m) is rendered “attire” in Jer 2:32.2. RSV renders (Isa 3:18) as “headband” (KJV) “cauls”). It was probably a gold or silver head ornament. See Dress.
Hood
HOOD. The Heb. term ṣānı̂p appears in the KJV as “hoods” (Isa 3:23), and “mitre” (Zech 3:5). The RSV renders the term “turban” in both instances, which is correct as the term means “something wrapped around.” See Dress.
Mitre
MITRE. A head covering or turban of linen, made for the high priest (except in Ezk 21:26 where the word translated “diadem” in KJV and “turban” in RSV refers to the headpiece worn by the prince of Israel). The mitre was worn by the high priest on the Day of Atonement (Lev 16:4).See Turban; High Priest,
Tire
TIRE. An archaic English word used for dress or adornment. Three words are so translated.1. Heb. yātab, to attire, dress, or adorn the head or hair (2 Kgs 9:30).2. Heb. p˒ēr, some sort of headdress or covering; RSV translates “turban” (Ezk 24:17, 23; 44:18; KJV “bonnets”).3. Heb. śahărōn, crescent-shaped
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Mitre
MITRE (av; Heb. miṣnep̱eṯ). One of the high priest’s holy garments. From the use of the Heb. verb in Is. 22:18 it is thought to have been a kind of turban (rsv) wound round the head. It is described in Ex. 28:4, 36–39. On it was worn ‘the plate of the holy crown’ engraved ‘Holy to the Lord’ (Ex. 39:28,
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Turban
TurbanA headdress made of cloth and wound around the head. Heb. pĕʾēr is a term for headgear in general, including ceremonial garlands (Isa. 3:20; 61:3, 10); it is used once for the high priest’s linen turban (Ezek. 44:18). Removal of one’s head covering was a normal part of mourning practices (cf.
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Headdress
Headdress (Heb. pe˒ēr). A type of head covering, perhaps practical as well as ornamental (Isa. 3:20; KJV “bonnet”). The Hebrew term designates also the turban (Ezek. 24:17, 23), the garland worn by the bridegroom (Isa. 61:3), and the linen cap worn by the priests (Exod. 39:28; Ezek. 44:18).
Turban
Turban. †A headdress made of cloth and wound around the head. Heb. pe˒ēr is a term for headgear in general, including ceremonial garlands (Isa. 3:20; 61:3, 10; KJV “ornaments,” “beauty”; JB “wreath”); it is used once for the high priest’s linen turban (Ezek. 44:18). Removal of one’s head covering
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
mitre
mitre (Gk. μίτρα, ‘turban’). The liturgical head-dress and part of the insignia of a bishop. In the E. Church it takes the form of crown, decorated with medallions in enamel or embroidery; it is apparently derived from the crown of the Byzantine Emperors, and was not worn by bishops until after the
tiara
tiara, extra-liturgical Papal headdress. First mentioned in the ‘Vita’ of Pope Constantine (708–15), it was in its original form a kind of white Phrygian cap, called ‘camelaucum’, worn as a sign of the Papal prerogative. Not later than the 11th cent. a coronet was placed round its lower rim, to which
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Head-dress
Head-dress. The Hebrews do not appear to have regarded a covering for the head as an essential article of dress. Hats were unknown. The earliest notice we have of such a thing is in connection with the sacerdotal vestments. Ex. 28:40. The tsânı̂ph (something like a turban) is noticed as being worn by
Mitre
Mitre (something rolled around the head), the turban or headdress of the high priest, made of fine linen cloth, eight yards long, folded around the head. On the front was a gold plate on which was inscribed Holiness to the Lord. Ex. 28:4, 37, 39; 39:28, 30; Lev. 8:9.Mitre.
Tire
Tire, an old English word for headdress. It was an ornamental headdress worn on festive occasions, Ezek. 24:17, 23, and perhaps, as some suppose, also an ornament for the neck worn by both women, Isa. 3:18, and men, and even on the necks of camels. Judges 8:21, 26.
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Headband
HEADBAND (Heb. plural, qishshūrı̂m). The Heb. term is translated “attire” (Jer. 2:32) and “sashes” (Isa. 3:20) in the NASB. The NIV renders “wedding ornaments” and “sashes,” respectively. See Dress.
Turban
TURBAN. A piece of cloth wrapped several times around the head and the rendering in the NASB of four Heb. words. See also Dress; and the discussion of the high priest in the articles Priesthood, Hebrew; Priest, High.1. Heb. miṣnepet (Ex. 28:4, 37, 39; 29:6; etc.), the headdress of the high priest.
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Cauls
CaulsIn Isa. 3:18 this word (Heb. shebisim), in the marg. “networks,” denotes network caps to contain the hair, worn by females. Others explain it as meaning “wreaths worn round the forehead, reaching from one ear to the other.”
Head-dress
Head-dressNot in common use among the Hebrews. It is first mentioned in Ex. 28:40 (A.V., “bonnets;” R.V., “head-tires”). It was used especially for purposes of ornament (Job 29:14; Isa. 3:23; 62:3). The Hebrew word here used, tsaniph, properly means a turban, folds of linen wound round the head. The
Hood
Hood(Heb. tsaniph a tiara round the head (Isa. 3:23; R.V., pl., “turbans”). Rendered “diadem,” Job 29:14; high priest’s “mitre,” Zech. 3:5; “royal diadem,” Isa. 62:3.
Mitre
Mitre(Heb. mitsnepheth), something rolled round the head; the turban or head-dress of the high priest (Ex. 28:4, 37, 39; 29:6, etc.). In the Authorized Version of Ezek. 21:26, this Hebrew word is rendered “diadem,” but in the Revised Version, “mitre.” It was a twisted band of fine linen, 8 yards in
Tires
Tires“To tire” the head is to adorn it (2 Kings 9:30). As a noun the word is derived from “tiara,” and is the rendering of the Heb. p’er, a “turban” or an ornament for the head (Ezek. 24:17; R.V., “headtire;” 24:23). In Isa. 3:18 the word saharonim is rendered “round tires like the moon,” and in Judg.