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Phrygia
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Phrygia
Phrygia (Φρυγία, Phrygia). The inner region of the western Asian peninsula (Anatolia) that forms the greater part of modern-day Turkey.
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Phrygia (Place)
PHRYGIA (PLACE) [Gk Phrygia (Φρυγια)]. The land of the Phrygians, a territory of W central Asia Minor, between the N Aegean and the river Halys (modern Kizil Irmak).A. History of PhrygiaB. Phrygia in the BibleC. Phrygia and Early ChristianityA. History of Phrygia1. The Early Period. The Phrygians
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Phrygia
Phrygia. Area in western Turkey on the Anatolian plateau, the boundaries of which cannot be defined precisely. The Phrygians were originally Europeans, called Phryges by the Greeks, who crossed the Hellespont from Macedonia and Thrace and settled here. This migration followed the general pattern of invasions
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Phrygia
Phrygia frijʹi-ə [Gk. Phrygia]. A large ancient country of central Asia Minor. It is mountainous and has tablelands reaching 1200 m (4000 ft) in height. Its name is derived from the Phryges, a Thracian tribe that in early times invaded the country and drove out or absorbed the earlier Asiatic inhabitants.
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Phrygia
PHRYGIA Area in western Turkey on the Anatolian plateau, the boundaries of which cannot be defined precisely. The Phrygians were originally Europeans, called Phryges by the Greeks, who crossed the Hellespont from Macedonia and Thrace and settled here. This migration followed the general pattern of invasions
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Phrygia
Phrygia (frij´ee-uh), a large region of interior western Asia Minor. The area itself consisted of a broad plateau that included mountains, pine forests, and river basins. During the nt period, the area of Phrygia was an ethnic territory, not an actual nation or province. It overlapped the Roman provinces
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Phrygia
PHRYGIA. A large mountainous area in central Asia Minor, the boundaries of which are difficult to determine, as the following historical discussion demonstrates.The Phrygians moved across the Hellespont from what is now European Turkey about 1200 b.c. and gradually spread over Asia Minor, destroying
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Phrygia
PHRYGIA. A tract of land centred on the W watershed of the great Anatolian plateau, and reaching N into the valley of the upper Sangarius, SW down the valley of the Maeander, and SE across the plateau, perhaps as far as Iconium. The Phrygians formed the (legendary?) kingdom of Midas. They fell under
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Phrygia
Phrygia (Gk. Phrygɩ́a)A territory in west central Asia Minor (Acts 2:10; 18:23), a plateau which includes rock mesas and mountains as well as broad river basins. Phrygia’s pine forests and sheep herds yielded timber and wool, and Phrygian artisans produced fine metal work, embroidery, and carpets.The
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Phrygia
Phrygia [frĭjˊĭ ə] (Gk. Phrygia).† A region of inland Asia Minor. Phrygia’s borders were not exact and varied from time to time. It can be identified generally as the region east of the coastal region of Lydia and north of Pisidia. In New Testament times Phrygia was divided between the Roman provinces
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Phrygia
PHRYGIA A region in western Asia Minor (modern Turkey) bounded by Bithynia, Galatia, and the western half of the province of Asia. The name “Meshech” in the Old Testament probably refers to Phrygia (Gen 10:2; 1 Chr 1:5; Ezek 27:13; 32:26; 38:2, 3; 39:1). Philip, a Phrygian, was named a governor of Jerusalem
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Phrygia
Phryg´ia (dry, barren). Perhaps there is no geographical term in the New Testament which is less capable of an exact definition. In fact there was no Roman province of Phrygia till considerably after the first establishment of Christianity in the peninsula of Asia Minor. The word was rather ethnological