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Philip (evangelist)
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A deacon chosen to oversee the distribution to the poor (Acts 6:5). One of the first Christians to preach the gospel outside Jerusalem.The narrative of Acts 8 depicts Philip as the first missionary to Samaria, where he encounters the magician Simon (Acts 8:4–13). In response to Philip’s success spreading the gospel, Peter and John travel from Jerusalem to Samaria and pray for the converts there to receive the Holy Spirit (Acts 8:14–17).After Philip’s mission to Samaria, an angel instructs him to go to the road between Gaza and Jerusalem. There, he preaches to the Ethiopian eunuch (Acts 8:26–39). After Philip baptizes the eunuch, the Holy Spirit transports him to Azotus (ancient Ashdod), 20 miles north of Gaza (Witherington III, Acts, 300). At the conclusion of Acts 8, Philip is preaching the gospel on the Mediterranean coast, from Azotus to Caesarea.After Philip’s activities near Gaza and Azotus in Acts 8, he is absent from the narrative until Acts 21:8–9, which mentions him living in Caesarea with his four daughters.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Philip the Evangelist
Philip the Evangelist A deacon chosen to oversee the distribution to the poor (Acts 6:5). One of the first Christians to preach the gospel outside Jerusalem.The narrative of Acts 8 depicts Philip as the first missionary to Samaria, where he encounters the magician Simon (Acts 8:4–13). In response to
Seven, the
Seven, the Seven men chosen by the Jerusalem church to distribute food, thereby allowing the apostles to focus on prayer and preaching the gospel (Acts 6:1–6).
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Philip (Person)
PHILIP (PERSON) [Gk Philippos (Φιλιππος)]. 1. Philip II, King of Macedonia (359–336 b.c.) and father of Alexander the Great (1 Macc 1:1, 6:2). Philip began his political career as the regent for the infant son of his dead brother Perdiccas III, but he soon displaced his nephew and became king instead.
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Philip
Philip. 1. Apostle whose name is placed fifth in each of the lists of the 12 after the two pairs of brothers, Simon Peter and Andrew, and James and John (Mt 10:3; Mk 3:18; Lk 6:14). John says that when John the Baptist bore witness to Jesus with the words, “Behold, the Lamb of God!”, two of his disciples
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Philip
8. One of the Seven. See Philip the Evangelist.Bibliography.—F.-M. Abel, Les Livres des Maccabeées (1949); J. A. Goldstein, 1 Maccabees (AB, 1976).R. L. Omanson
Philip the Evangelist
Philip the Evangelist [Gk. Philippos]. One of the seven men chosen to minister to the neglected Greek-speaking widows in the church at Jerusalem (Acts 6:1–6). Though the name “Philip” is Greek and he was selected to act in the interest of the widows of the Hellenists, it is difficult to ascertain whether
Seven, The
Seven, The [Gk. hoi heptá] (Acts 21:8). A group of gifted leaders, “of good repute, full of the Spirit and of wisdom,” chosen according to Acts 6:1–6 to look after the needs of the Hellenistic Jewish Christian widows, and referred to as “the seven” in 21:8.The Seven themselves appear to have been
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Philip
PHILIP1. Apostle whose name is placed fifth in each of the lists of the twelve after the two pairs of brothers, Simon Peter and Andrew, and James and John (Mt 10:3; Mk 3:18; Lk 6:14). John says that when John the Baptist bore witness to Jesus with the words, “Behold, the Lamb of God!” two of his disciples
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Philip
Philip (fil´ip).1 Philip II, king of Macedonia (359–336 bce) and father of Alexander the Great (1 Macc. 1:1; 6:2). He unified Macedonia and was a major proponent of Hellenistic culture. See also Alexander; Macedonia.2 Philip V, king of Macedonia (220–179 bce), mentioned in 1 Macc. 8:5. He was decisively
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Philip
PHILIP. Four men bear this name (“lover of horses”) in the NT.1. Philip the tetrarch, brother of Herod Antipas and ruler of Ituraea and Trachonitis (Lk 3:1). He was son of Herod the Great by his fifth wife Cleopatra of Jerusalem. Appointed by Augustus, he reigned for 37 years (4 b.c.a.d. 34). Josephus
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Philip
PHILIP (Gk. philippos, ‘horse-lover’). There are 4 characters of this name known to the NT writers.1. A son of Herod the Great and Mariamne, the daughter of Simon the high priest. For a time he was next in succession to Antipater (Jos., Ant. 17.53), but this arrangement was revoked by later wills, and
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Philip
Philip (Gk. Phɩ́lippos)1. Philip II, king of Macedon (359–336 b.c.e.). The father of Alexander the Great (1 Macc. 1:1), he was assassinated before embarking on a military expedition against Persia (Josephus Ant. 11.304–305). He unified Macedonia, adopted Greek culture, and dominated Greece through the
Seven, the
Seven, theA designation for the seven men (Gk. hoi heptá) appointed by the Church and ordained by the apostles to “wait on tables” (NRSV mg “keep accounts”) and minister to the widows (Acts 6:1–6; cf. 21:8).See Deacon.
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Seven, the
Seven, the (Gk. hoi heptá).* A designation for the seven men appointed by the Church and ordained by the apostles to “serve tables” and minister to the widows (Acts 6:1–6). The term appears at 21:8. See Deacon.
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Philip
PHILIP The name of six men in the Bible.1. One of the twelve apostles. He is mentioned in Acts 1:13 and in John 1:43–51, which says he came from Bethsaida, the city of Andrew and Peter. Jesus called Philip to join him with the words, “Follow me.” Philip then brought Nathaniel to Jesus, convinced that
Dictionary of the Later New Testament & Its Developments
Philip the Evangelist
Philip the EvangelistThe description—“the evangelist, one of the Seven”—in Acts 21:8 distinguishes this Philip from his apostolic namesake (Lk 6:14; Acts 1:13) and recalls his roles as pioneering proclaimer of the Christian gospel (Acts 8; see Evangelism) and partner in charitable ministry (Acts 6:1–6).