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Pentateuch
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
The first five books of the Old Testament, known as the Torah in the Hebrew Bible. Also sometimes called “the Law,” although that term has additional connotations (e.g., Moses’ teachings; just Deuteronomy) and is not always synonymous with the Pentateuch or Torah. For additional information on the Pentateuch, see this article: Torah.The Pentateuch is not synonymous with the Samaritan Pentateuch, which is a particular version of the Pentateuch preserved by the Samaritan community containing its own variants.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Pentateuch
Pentateuch The first five books of the Old Testament, known as the Torah in the Hebrew Bible. Also sometimes called “the Law,” although that term has additional connotations (e.g., Moses’ teachings; just Deuteronomy) and is not always synonymous with the Pentateuch or Torah. For additional information
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Torah (Pentateuch)
TORAH (PENTATEUCH). The Torah is the section of the Bible composed of the first five books: Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy. The name Torah derives from Hebrew tôrâ, meaning “instruction.” The work is also known as the Pentateuch, from Greek pentateuchos, meaning a five-book work,
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Pentateuch
Pentateuch. Word formed by two Greek words, pente, “five,” and teuchos, “book” and commonly used to refer to the first five books of the OT (Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy). This portion of God’s Word was written by the prophet Moses (Ex 17:14; 24:4; 34:27; Nm 33:1, 2; Dt 31:9, 22)
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Pentateuch
Pentateuch penʹtə-tōōk [<Gk pénta—‘five’ + teúchos ‘book’]. The first five books of the Bible. I. Introduction II. ContentsA. Theological MessageB. Historical DimensionC. Literary Character III. Significance IV. Origin, Composition, Authorship, and NatureA. Precritical Positions1. OT2.
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Pentateuch
PENTATEUCH* Word formed by two Greek words, pente (“five”) and teuchos (“case”) and commonly used to refer to the first five books of the OT (Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy), which were encased together, as in one book. This portion of God’s Word was written by Moses (Ex 17:14; 24:4;
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Pentateuch
Pentateuch (pen´tuh-took), a traditional name used by Christians for the first five books of the Bible. The books are also known as the “books of Moses” or the “Law of Moses.” They represent the Torah, the first portion of the Tanakh, Jewish Bible. See also law; Old Testament; Pentateuch, sources of
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Pentateuch
PENTATEUCH. This designation, derived from two Gr. words, pente, “five,” and teuchos, “volume,” and meaning five volumes or books, is applied to the first five books of the Bible. Later Jews designated these books “the five fifths of the law.” Evidence for this fivefold division is as early as Philo
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Pentateuch
PENTATEUCH. The first five books of the OT (Gn., Ex., Lv., Nu., Dt.) constitute the first and most important section of the threefold Jewish *Canon. Usually called by the Jews sēp̱er hattôrâ, ‘the book of the law’, or hattôrâ, ‘the law’ (see KB, p. 403, for suggested derivations of the word, which
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Pentateuch
PentateuchThe first five books (Gk. pénta teúchos) of the Bible, the Torah (Heb. “law, instruction”). In antiquity these books were ascribed to Mosaic authorship (e.g., 4QMMT C.10; Josephus Ag. Ap. 1.39; Luke 24:44), hence the traditional designation, Five Books of Moses. The content of these books
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Pentateuch
Pentateuch [pĕnˊ tə tōōk].† The first five books of the Old Testament (Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy), constituting the first and most important of the three divisions of the Hebrew canon.
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Pentateuch
PENTATEUCH The name Christian tradition gives to the first five books of the Bible: Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy. In Hebrew, they are known collectively as tôrâ, meaning “instruction” or “teaching.” “Tôrâ” was routinely translated nomos, “law,” in the Greek Septuagint. The Greek
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Pentateuch
Pentateuch (Gk. πεντα, ‘five’ + τεῦχος, ‘book’). A title in general use among biblical scholars for the five ‘Books of *Moses’: *Genesis, *Exodus, *Leviticus, *Numbers, and *Deuteronomy. Traditionally, these Books were held to have been written, almost in their entirety, by Moses himself. However, during