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Patriarchs
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Patriarchs
Patriarchs The generations of Israel’s founders whose lives are recounted in Gen 12–50. The covenant made by God with Abraham forms the basis of the Mosaic covenant.
Patriarchs, Historical Issues
Patriarchs, Historical Issues The biblical texts relay the history of the patriarchs and are sometimes understood to affirm the historicity of the patriarchs. This history can alternately be understood as fictional narratives invented during the exile in order to give an identity to the Israelites in
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Patriarchs
Patriarchs The forefathers of the people of Israel. The term can be used in a broad sense, referring, e.g., to David (Acts 2:29), to the list of eleven revered ancestors from Abraham to Daniel (1 Macc. 2:51–60), or even to the Antediluvian Patriarchs. However, the patriarchs par excellence are Abraham,
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Patriarchs
patriarchs, a traditional term for referring to the three male figures prominent in the early history of Israel: Abraham (Gen. 12–24), Isaac (25–36), and Jacob (25–36). The strong tendency in modern biblical study is to speak of “ancestors” in order to include the wives of these figures: Sarah and Hagar;
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Patriarch
PATRIARCH. Head or founder of a family or tribe, as used of Abraham (Heb 7:4) and of Jacob’s 12 sons (Acts 7:8–9). The word is applied to David (Acts 2:29) because he founded the line of messianic descent (2 Sam 7:11–16). See Abraham; Patriarchal Age.
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Patriarchs
PatriarchsThe leaders of families and clans within ancient Israel. The term derives from Heb. rāʾšê ʾăḇôṯ (“heads of the fathers”), translated in the LXX as “rulers of the fathers” (Gk. archaɩ́ patriós) and simplified as patriárchēs in the NT and Apocrypha. Within the discipline of biblical
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Patriarchs
Patriarchs †The forefathers of the Israelites. Gk. patriárchēs (pl. patriárchai) is used in the LXX for prominent members of tribe and clan groups who serve some sort of administrative or judicial function (1 Chr. 24:31; 27:22; 2 Chr. 19:8; 23:20; 26:12). In 4 Maccabees, however, the term
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Patriarch
PATRIARCH The head of a tribe, family, or clan in biblical history. More narrowly, the prominent male figures of the book of Genesis, especially Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. The book of Acts also gives the title “patriarch” to the twelve sons of Jacob and to King David (Acts 2:29) (CCC 61, 205).The main
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
patriarch
patriarch (biblical). Literally the father or ruler of a family or tribe. The term is most commonly used of the three great forefathers of Israel, *Abraham, *Isaac, and *Jacob (cf. Gen. 12–50); the dating of these traditions has been the subject of continuing debate (on which see abraham). The term is
patriarch
patriarch (ecclesiastical). A title dating from the 6th cent., for the bishops of the five chief sees of Christendom: Rome, *Alexandria, *Antioch, *Constantinople, and *Jerusalem. Their jurisdiction extended over the adjoining territories, and included the right of ordaining the ‘*metropolitans’, i.e.
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Patriarch
Patriarch (father of a tribe), the name given to the head of a family or tribe in Old Testament times. In common usage the title of patriarch is assigned especially to those whose lives are recorded in Scripture previous to the time of Moses, as Adam, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. (“In the early history
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Patriarch
PATRIARCH (Gk. patriarchēs, patēr, “father,” archēs, “head”). The founder of a tribe, a progenitor. It is applied in the NT to Abraham (Heb. 7:4), to the sons of Jacob (Acts 7:8–9), and to David (2:29). In common usage the title patriarch is assigned especially to those whose lives are recorded in
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Patriarch
Patriarcha name employed in the New Testament with reference to Abraham (Heb. 7:4), the sons of Jacob (Acts 7:8, 9), and to David (2:29). This name is generally applied to the progenitors of families or “heads of the fathers” (Josh. 14:1) mentioned in Scripture, and they are spoken of as antediluvian
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Patriarch
Patriarchpatriarch, the male head of a family or a clan. In the ot the term conventionally and specifically refers to the key figures in the Genesis narrative, Abraham (Gen. 12–24), Isaac (Gen. 25–36), and Jacob (Gen. 25–36), who are reckoned as the progenitors and pioneers of biblical faith. The figure