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Old Testament Pseudepigrapha
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A term for a modern grouping of ancient writings set in the Old Testament period but written later, mostly between 200 bc and ad 200. These works often contain pseudonymous speeches of, or are pseudonymously ascribed to, biblical and deuterocanonical figures. Many of these texts are useful for background studies of the New Testament. Most of these texts are noncanonical for all Christian groups.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Pseudepigrapha, Old Testament
Pseudepigrapha, Old Testament A term for a modern grouping of ancient writings set in the Old Testament period but written later, mostly between 200 bc and ad 200. These works often contain pseudonymous speeches of, or are pseudonymously ascribed to, biblical and deuterocanonical figures. Many of these
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Pseudepigrapha, OT
PSEUDEPIGRAPHA, OT. A modern collection of ancient writings that are essential reading for an understanding of early Judaism (ca. 250 b.c.e. to 200 c.e.) and of Christian origins. Many of these documents were compiled or composed by Jews, while others were written by Jews but eventually were expanded
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Pseudepigrapha
Pseudepigrapha (soo´duh-pig´ruh-fuh; Gk., “falsely ascribed writings”), a collection of some sixty-five documents connected with, but not part of, the Jewish Bible (Christian ot) and written ca. 300 bce–200 ce. They are ostensibly Jewish writings, but some exist only in versions edited by later Christians,
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Pseudepigrapha
PSEUDEPIGRAPHA. The term is used to describe those Jewish writings which were excluded from the OT Canon and which find no place in the Apocrypha. For the purpose of this article the term will also exclude the sectarian documents of the Qumran library (*Dead Sea Scrolls). Unlike the Apocrypha, which
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Pseudepigrapha
PseudepigraphaLit., “falsely ascribed writings.” This anachronistic term describes a variety of ancient noncanonical Jewish documents from the Hellenistic and Roman periods (ca. 250 b.c.e.–200 c.e.). The texts are not a part of the Hebrew Bible (Protestant OT) or the OT Apocrypha (roughly equivalent
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Psuedepigrapha
Psuedepigrapha [sōōˊdə pĭgˊrə fə].† A general term for Jewish writings of approximately the second century B.C. through the second century A.D. not included in either the Bible, the Apocrypha, the documents found only among the Dead Sea Scrolls, the rabbinic literature, or works attributable to
Dictionary of the Later New Testament & Its Developments
Apocryphal and Pseudepigraphal Writings
Apocryphal and Pseudepigraphal WritingsThis article covers extracanonical Christian literature that is either attributed to biblical persons as authors or recounts narratives about biblical persons that parallel or supplement the biblical narratives. In most early Christian literature of this kind the
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Pseudepigrapha
Pseudepigrapha. Writings ascribed to some other than their real author, generally with a view to giving them an enhanced authority. The term is used esp. of the pseudonymous Jewish works, dating from the centuries immediately before and after the beginning of the Christian era, which were not included
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Pseudepigrapha
PseudepigraphaPseudepigrapha (so̅o̅-duh-pigʹruh-fuh; Gk., ‘writings with false superscriptions’), a collection of some sixty-five documents connected with but not part of the ot and written by Jews or Christians, for the most part during the three centuries before and the two centuries after the beginning
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Pseudepigrapha
PSEUDEPIGRAPHA — a collection of Jewish books containing various forms of literature, using names of famous people in Israel’s history for the titles of the books. The real authors are unknown. Such names as Ezra, Baruch, Enoch, Solomon, Moses, and Adam are used to add authority to the writing.A few
A Dictionary of Christian Biography, Literature, Sects and Doctrines, Volumes I–IV
Pseudepigrapha in the Fathers
PSEUDEPIGRAPHA IN THE FATHERS.—In the present article we give references to notices occurring in the earlier Christian writers to a variety of ancient books and shorter documents, some falsely ascribed to the personages of Scripture, others being apocryphal accounts of their life, or of some part of