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Nunc Dimittis
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Nunc Dimittis
Nunc Dimittis The Latin title for Simeon’s poem in Luke 2:29–32. It can be translated as “Now you are permitting me to depart.”
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Nunc Dimittis
NUNC DIMITTIS This is the Latin for “Now you are permitting me to depart,” and has become the title of the poem of praise recited by Simeon in Luke 2:29–32 (See Fitzmyer Luke I–IX AB, 418–33; Farris 1985: 127–42.)This poem, together with Simeon’s remarks in vv 34–35, plays an important literary role
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Nunc Dimittis
Nunc Dimittis (nuhnk di-mit´tis), a traditional Latin name given to a poem included in Luke’s account of the birth of Jesus (2:29–32). It is a hymn of joy and praise attributed to Simeon, a pious man who had been waiting to see God’s great act of deliverance on behalf of all people. The poem receives
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Nunc Dimittis
NUNC DIMITTIS. The prophecies accompanying Christ’s advent occur not (as with John the Baptist) at circumcision but at the rites of purification a month later. According to an ancient custom babies were brought to an old doctor or rabbi in the Temple for a blessing. Perhaps in this setting Simeon, taking
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Nunc Dimittis
Nunc DimittisLatin name derived from the opening words (“now You are dismissing”) of Simeon’s canticle (Luke 2:29–32), sung—since the 5th century—every evening at Compline, the last of the daily monastic offices.The “prophet” Simeon (“the Holy Spirit rested on him”; Luke 2:25) declared that his life
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Nunc Dimittis
Nunc Dimittis [nûnkˊ dĭ mĭtˊəs].† The traditional name given to the brief psalm of praise of Simeon (Luke 2:29–32), derived from the first two words of the Latin Vulgate text (“now let depart”). The setting for the song is the temple, where Simeon encounters Mary and Joseph who have brought their
Dictionary of Jesus and the Gospels
Simeon's Song
Simeon’s songAlso known as the Nunc Dimittis, Simeon’s Song (Lk 2:29–32) is a particularly beautiful and moving poetic feature of Luke’s overture to the Gospel and Acts.It has been argued that Luke himself, following the known practice of the Greek historians who were to some degree his models, composed
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Nunc Dimittis
NUNC DIMITTIS (Latin, “now you are dismissing”) The first words of the Latin Vulgate version of the canticle sung by Simeon in Luke 2:29–35. The hymn of praise was recited in thanksgiving after Simeon saw the infant Messiah. The canticle consists of two parts. The first part expresses Simeon’s recognition
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Nunc Dimittis
Nunc Dimittis. The Song of *Simeon (Lk. 2:29–32), so named from its initial words in the *Vulgate version. It has formed part of daily prayers since the 4th cent., its use being already prescribed in the ‘*Apostolic Constitutions’ (7. 48). In the E. Rite it is said at *Vespers. In the Roman and many
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Nunc Dimittis
Nunc DimittisNunc Dimittis (nuhnk di-mit«is), one of several poetical pieces or psalms included in Luke’s account of the birth of Jesus (chaps. 1–2) in order to emphasize the significance and joy that surrounded Jesus’ coming. The Nunc Dimittis (Luke 2:29–32) is a hymn of joy and praise attributed
Dictionary of Phrase and Fable
Nunc Dimittis
Nunc Dimittis. The canticle of Simeon is so called, from the first two words in the Latin version (Luke 2:29–32).
Ecclesiastical Dictionary: Containing, in Concise Form, Information upon Ecclesiastical, Biblical, Archæological, and Historical Subjects
Nunc Dimittis
Nunc Dimittis.—The name given to the Canticle of Simeon (Luke 2:29–32), which forms part of the Compline office of the Breviary.