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Nippur
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
(Sumerian, Nibru; uruEN.LIL or EN.LILki). City located in the central Euphrates River valley northwest of Lagaš and southeast of Kish, between modern-day Baghdad and Basra in south-central Iraq. Name means “Enlil City.”
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Nippur
Nippur (Sumerian, Nibru; uruEN.LIL or EN.LILki). City located in the central Euphrates River valley northwest of Lagaš and southeast of Kish, between modern-day Baghdad and Basra in south-central Iraq. Name means “Enlil City.”
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Nippur
NIPPUR (32°08´N; 45°03´E). The mounds of Nippur, located in the desert about 150 kms SE of Baghdad, stand today to a height of 18 meters above the alluvial plain. From the time of its establishment as a village along the Euphrates in the 6th millennium b.c. to its abandonment in the 9th century a.d.,
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Nippur
Nippur. City in ancient Mesopotamia (modern Iraq), and a center of religious, commercial, and literary activity. Although the city is not mentioned in the Bible, either as Nippur or under any other name, the discoveries made at Nippur in the course of archaeological investigation are important for the
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Nippur
Nippur ni-poo̅rʹ [Sum dEn-lilki; Akk. Ni-ip pu-ru]. An ancient holy city, called “the bond of heaven and earth” (Sum dur-an-ki), and the principal religious center of southern Mesopotamia. Although Nippur is not mentioned in the Bible (despite the talmudic identification of Nippur with Calneh), cuneiform
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Nippur
Nippur (ni-poor´; Sumerian Nibru), a city in central Babylonia. The city occupied a special place in the political and religious life of Mesopotamia, especially in the period prior to 1500 bce. Its god was Enlil. The god, his priests, the temple, and the city possessed special political prerogatives;
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Nippur
NIPPUR. One of the major cities of ancient Mesopotamia located c. 95 miles SE of Baghdad, Nippur occupied a unique position because of its extraordinary religious status. Though never a political capital, so far as we can tell, Nippur figured prominently throughout the entire recorded history of Mesopotamia.
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Nippur
Nippur (Sum. Nibru)A city with a unique role in Mesopotamian history and society as its millennia-long religious center yet never a political base. Nippur (Tell Nuffar) was established on the bank of the Euphrates River during the 6th millennium b.c.e. and, except for relatively brief periods, was continuously
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Nippur
NippurNippur (nipʹpo̅o̅r; Sumerian Nibru), a city in central Babylonia. The city occupied a special place in the political and religious life of Mesopotamia, especially in the period prior to 1500 b.c. Its god was Enlil. The god, his priests, the temple, and the city possessed special political prerogatives;
Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Nippur
NIPPUR (Nĭpʹ pŭr) City located in Mesopotamia, approximately 50 miles southeast of the ancient city of Babylon and approximately 100 miles south of modern Baghdad, Iraq. Although it is never mentioned in the Bible, its history is important in the larger context of the biblical world. It is believed
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 4, M–P
Nippur
Nippur ni-poor’. An ancient Mesopotamian city, known today as Nuffar, about 100 mi. S of Baghdad or 50 mi. SE of Babylon. It was founded by the Ubaid people c. 4000 b.c. Although the city wielded no political power, it was the undisputed religious and cultural center from the early 3rd millennium until
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
NIPPUR
NIPPUR ni-poor´. A city in Mesopotamia located about 60 mi. (95 km) southeast of ancient Babylon and occupied almost continually from the early 6th millennium bce to the 9th cent. ce.In the late 3rd and early 2nd millennia bce, Nippur was one of the principal sites in ancient Sumer because of its central