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New Testament Apocrypha
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
Early noncanonical writings, mainly from the second through fourth centuries ad, that share the genres (gospels, letters, acts, apocalypses), characters, and sometimes the content of New Testament writings. However, unlike the canonical New Testament texts, apocryphal writings did not achieve wide acceptance in the church.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Apocrypha, New Testament
Apocrypha, New Testament Early noncanonical writings, mainly from the second through fourth centuries ad, that share the genres (gospels, letters, acts, apocalypses), characters, and sometimes the content of New Testament writings. However, unlike the canonical New Testament texts, apocryphal writings
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
New Testament Apocrypha
NEW TESTAMENT APOCRYPHA. The extent of the NT apocrypha is more difficult to determine than that of the OT. The term will here be confined to non-canonical works attributed to, or purporting to give extra-canonical information about, Christ or the apostles. Works written without such pretensions are
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Apocrypha, New Testament
Apocrypha, New Testament. A vast body of noncanonical religious writings from the first few centuries of the Christian era. Quite popular among the masses of early Christian believers, they range from the relatively orthodox to the bizarre and eccentric. Many were intended to supplement what might be
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Apocryphal New Testament
Apocryphal New Testament. A modern title for various early Christian books outside the *Canon of the NT which are similar in form or content to the corresponding canonical Scriptures. The epithet ‘apocryphal’ does not of itself convey the modern sense of fictitious invention.Gospels. Many of these
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Apocryphal New Testament
Apocryphal New TestamentApocryphal New Testament, a vast body of literature that, generally speaking, refers to extracanonical Christian writings that claim to preserve memories of Jesus and the apostles and that frequently imitate the major genres of nt literature: gospel, acts, epistle, and apocalypse.
Baker Encyclopedia of Christian Apologetics
Apocrypha, Old and New Testaments
Apocrypha, Old and New Testaments. Apocrypha most commonly refers to disputed books that Protestants reject and Roman Catholics and Orthodox communions accept into the Old Testament. The word Apocrypha means “hidden” or “doubtful.” So those who accept these documents prefer to call them “deuterocanonical,”
Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Apocrypha, New Testament
APOCRYPHA, NEW TESTAMENT Collective term referring to a large body of religious writings dating back to the early Christian centuries that are similar in form to the NT (Gospels, acts, epistles, and apocalypses) but were never included as a part of the canon of Scripture.Meaning of the Term “Apocrypha”
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 1, A–C
Apocryphal New Testament
Apocryphal New Testament. The collective title given to a number of documents, ranging in date from the early Christian centuries to the Middle Ages and even into modern times, all similar in form to the NT books (gospels, epistles, acts, apocalypses) but never finally received into the canon (NT). The
Evangelical Dictionary of Theology
Apocrypha, New Testament
Apocrypha, New Testament. A substantial collection published under the names of apostolic writers during the second and subsequent centuries. For the most part they were deliberate fabrications and never had any serious claim to canonicity. In this connection, apocrypha means untrue or spurious.Evidently,
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
APOCRYPHA, NT
APOCRYPHA, NT. The NT Apocrypha (from the Greek apokryphos [ἀπόκρυφος], plural apokrypha [ἀπόκρυφα], meaning “hidden, secret”) are a heterogeneous group of texts initially gathered together by European scholars in the 16th-cent. Johann Albert Fabricius first published such a collection in his Codex