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Masada
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Masada
Masada (Μασάδα, Masada; מְצָדָה‎, metsadah). A mountain in the Judaean Desert, located southwest of the Dead Sea. Palace-fortress of Herod the Great. Final rebel stronghold of the Great Jewish Revolt (ad 66–73/4).
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Masada
MASADA (M.R. 183080). A stronghold (which is a translation of the Hebrew) situated at the E Judean desert close to the Dead Sea, some 16.5 km S of En-gedi. It is along the famous Afro-Syrian geological break, and stands as a rocky mountain, separated from the cliff to form a natural fortress. The plateau
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Masada
Masada. Rock fortress on the western shore of the Dead Sea, opposite the Lisan, about 19 miles south of En-gedi and 10½ miles north of Sodom, where the Jewish Zealots made their last stand against the Romans in ad 73. Today it is called in Arabic Qasr es-Sebbe and in Hebrew Metsada.An aerial view
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Masada
Masada mə-sä̀də [Heb. meṣāḏâ—‘mountain fortress’; Gk. Masada]. A rocky plateau rising from the western shore of the Dead Sea, used as a fortress by Herod the Great and then by the Zealots, and given lasting memory by Josephus. Although it is not mentioned by name in the Bible, this subject should
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Masada
MASADA* Rock fortress on the western shore of the Dead Sea, opposite the Lisan, about 10 miles (16.1 kilometers) south of En-gedi where the Jewish Zealots made their last stand against the Romans in ad 73. Today it is called in Arabic Qasr es-Sebbe, and in Hebrew, Metsada.The rock rises some 1,400 feet
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Masada
Masada (muh-sah´duh; Heb. mesadah, “stronghold”), a rock forming a massive natural stronghold that stands in the Judean desert near the western shore of the Dead Sea, some twelve miles south of En-gedi. The site was probably first fortified by Alexander Jannaeus (103–76 bce), whose coins have been found
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Masada
MASADA. A high “ship-shaped” rock formation converted into a fortification by the high priest Jonathan sometime after 152 b.c. It is located opposite the Lisan (broad sandy peninsula jutting into the Dead Sea from the E) on the W side of the Dead Sea between the shore line and the cliffs surrounding
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Masada
Masada (Gk. Masada)A rock fortress on an isolated high hill surrounded by precipitous cliffs and therefore nearly impregnable, located 16.5 km. (10 mi.) S of En-gedi on the western shore of the Dead Sea, across from the Lisan Peninsula. Scholars generally agree that it was the Hasmonean high priest
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Masada
Masada [mə säˊdə] (Aram. meṣāḏâ “fortress”; Gk. Masada).† A nearly impregnable wilderness fortress near the west shore of the Dead Sea ca. 33 km. (21 mi.) southeast of Hebron. The rock of Masada rises with sheer cliffs some 180 to 250 m. (600 to 820 ft.) above the surrounding low
The Archaeological Encyclopedia of the Holy Land
Masada
MASADA A natural rock fortress on the western shore of the Dead Sea. Josephus (War vii, 285) states that a fortress was built at Masada by ‘the high priest Jonathan’. This could have been either the brother of Judas Maccabaeus or Alexander Jannaeus, whose Hebrew name was Jonathan. The place is still
Compton’s Encyclopedia
Masada
Masadaflat mountaintop fortress in Israel near coast of Dead Sea, where Jews made a last desperate stand against Romans in ad 72–73; about 1,424 ft (434 m) high with an area of 18 acres (7 hectares) on top; dominated by palaces and fortresses built by Herod the Great; after fall of Jerusalem in ad 70,
Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Masada
MASADA (Mȧ saʹ dȧ) A mesa on the western shore of the Dead Sea. It rises about 820 feet above the surrounding valleys and was used as a stronghold between 142 b.c. and a.d. 73. Jonathan Maccabeus first fortified the rock. Herod the Great made it a monument to his building activity. A band of rebellious
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