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Marcion
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
Second-century ad teacher and perhaps the most infamous heretic in early Christianity. Marcion was a native of Pontus (now northern Turkey) who arrived in Rome around ad 140 and joined a church. After developing his own distinct theology and scriptural canon, he formed his own sect (later known as Marcionites) and planted congregations throughout the Mediterranean.Marcion is best known for denying that the God of the Jewish Scriptures (for Christians, the Old Testament) was the same as the God of Christian Scriptures. His own scriptures were limited to one Gospel (Luke) and 10 letters of Paul. Marcion’s views about God, Christ, the canon of Scripture, and the relation between Judaism and Christianity prompted the early church fathers to clarify their positions on these issues.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Marcion
Marcion (Μαρκίων, Markiōn). Second-century ad teacher and perhaps the most infamous heretic in early Christianity. Marcion was a native of Pontus (now northern Turkey) who arrived in Rome around ad 140 and joined a church. After developing his own distinct theology and scriptural canon, he formed his
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Marcion
MARCION. To the heresiologists of later centuries, Marcion was the most formidable heretic of the 2d century c.e. His teaching sprang from a radical emphasis upon the discontinuity between Christianity and Judaism. The God of Jesus, he asserted, was not the same as the God of the Hebrew Scriptures. While
Dictionary of the Later New Testament & Its Developments
Marcion
MarcionMarcion (c. 80-c. 155) was the most influential heretical Christian of the second century. He rejected Judaism and the OT and with them the God of the OT. Preaching a gospel of love, Marcion focused on what he implied was a second, higher and better God of the NT. He established the earliest
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Marcion
Marcion (d. c. 160), heretic. He was a native of Sinope in Pontus and a wealthy shipowner. Acc. to *Hippolytus (Syntagma ap. *Epiphanius, Haer. 42) he was the son of a Bishop who excommunicated him on grounds of immorality. Making his way to Rome, c. 140, he attached himself to the local orthodox Church.
The Dictionary of Historical Theology
Marcion (d. c. 154)
Marcion (d. c. 154)Marcion was a second-century heretic who was known for his work as a reformer, biblical critic, canon-maker and theologian. He was born at Sinope, a seaport city in the province of Pontus (modern-day northern Turkey). The son of a bishop and a very prosperous shipowner, Marcion travelled
Ecclesiastical Dictionary: Containing, in Concise Form, Information upon Ecclesiastical, Biblical, Archæological, and Historical Subjects
Marcion
Marcion and Marcionites.—Marcion, a Gnostic philosopher and heresiarch, of the second century. Originally a priest of Sinope in Pontus. He had distinguished himself by his zeal and his ascetical life, but, falling into the crime of incontinence, he was excommunicated by his own father, the Bishop of
The Westminster Dictionary of Theologians
Marcion
Marcion (ca. 100–ca. 160). Theologian and philosopher of gnostic tendencies and founder of a Christian sect that bore his name (Marcionites). He was born in Sinope, Pontus (a region in what is now Turkey), and was probably the son of the bishop of that city.Among the works attributed to M. are his Antithesis
The Thiselton Companion to Christian Theology
Marcion
MarcionMarcion (d. c. 160) made his way to Rome c. 140, and in 144 organized his followers into a community separate from the church. Irenaeus, Clement, Tertullian, Hippolytus, and Origen regarded his system of thought as heretical. Marcion claimed that while the NT taught a gospel of love, the OT was
Pocket Dictionary of Church History: Over 300 Terms Clearly and Concisely Defined
Marcion
Marcion (d. 160). Known to Christian writers of the second century as the most notorious heretic of his time, Marcion of Pontus in Asia Minor was the son of a bishop who, according to tradition, *excommunicated him because of his immoral behavior. Marcion surfaced in Rome, where he built a sizable community
A Dictionary of Christ and the Gospels: Aaron–Zion
(3) Marcion
(3) Marcion was a contemporary of Valentinus.—The principle of his work is to secure a Gospel that shall represent the pure doctrine of Christ, unmixed with Jewish prejudices, which he regarded as inherent in the minds of the primitive Apostles. We find him rejecting all others in favour of St. Luke,
A Dictionary of Christian Biography, Literature, Sects and Doctrines, Volumes I–IV
Marcion
MARCION, one of the most noted and most permanently influential of the heretics of the second century.
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 4, M–P
Marcion
Marcion mahr’shuhn (Μαρκίων). A native of Sinope in Pontus, Marcion moved to Rome c. a.d. 140 and joined the church there but in 144 was excommunicated for his heretical opinions (however, an earlier date for Marcion’s work is argued by R. J. Hoffmann, Marcion: On the Restitution of Christianity [1984],