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Mandrake
Dictionaries
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Mandrake
Mandrake. Mediterranean herb believed to have had aphrodisiac properties (Gn 30) and noted for its fragrance (Sg 7:13).See Plants.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Mandrakes
Mandrakes manʹdrāks [Heb. dûḏāʾîm; Gk. mandragóras] (Gen. 30:14–16; Cant. 7:13 [MT 14]). The mandrake (Mandragora officinarum L.) is a member of the Solanaceae or potato order and is closely allied to the nightshade and tomato. Commonly found in Palestine, it ripens during the wheat harvest (Gen.
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Mandrake
MANDRAKE Mediterranean herb believed to have had aphrodisiac properties (Gn 30) and noted for its fragrance (Sg 7:13). See Plants.
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Mandrake
mandrake (Mandragora officinarium), a plant of the nightshade family that spreads large spinach-shaped leaves in a rosette pattern. The flowers that form in the middle of the rosettes later become yellow-red fruits resembling tomatoes. It was considered a delicacy and was also noted for its fragrance
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Mandrake
MandrakeA round, greenish-yellow, plumlike fruit (although some suggest that tuberous root masses are indicated) of Mandragora vernalis, a perennial plant most commonly known from southern Palestine and Egypt, but also appearing in Syria and, apparently, in the area of Paddan-aram.The mandrake was
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Mandrake
Mandrake (Heb. dûḏay). Mandragora officinarum L., an herb in the nightshade family (Solanaceae) common in Syria and Palestine, as throughout the Mediterranean region. The mandrake is nearly stemless with oval leaves, purple flowers, and fruits that ripen to bright yellow or orange during May, “the
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Mandrake
MANDRAKE An herb, Mandragora officinarum, that is found in Palestine and is noted for its distinctive roots that are shaped like a human body. Probably because of that resemblance, it was especially valued as an aphrodisiac (Gen 30:14; Song 7:13). The Hebrew name of the herb is derived from a root meaning
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Mandrakes
Mandrakes (Heb. dudâim) are mentioned in Gen. 30:14, 15, 16, and in Song. 7:13. The mandrake, Atropa mandragora, is closely allied to the well-known deadly nightshade, A. belladonna, and to the tomato, and belongs to the order Solanaceæ, or potato family. It grows in Palestine and Mesopotamia. (It grows
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Mandrakes
MandrakesHebrew dudaim; i.e., “love-plants”, occurs only in Gen. 30:14–16 and Cant. 7:13. Many interpretations have been given of this word dudaim. It has been rendered “violets,” “Lilies,” “jasmines,” “truffles or mushrooms,” “flowers,” the “citron,” etc. The weight of authority is in favour of its
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Mandrake
Mandrakemandrake (Mandragora officinarium), a plant of the nightshade family that spreads large spinach-shaped leaves in a rosette pattern. The flowers that form in the middle of the rosettes later become yellow-red fruits resembling tomatoes. Although considered a delicacy, it has an unusual smell
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
MANDRAKES
MANDRAKES<man’-draks> (דּוּדָאִים‎ [dudha’im]; [Μανδραγόρας, mandragoras] (Gen 30:14 f; Song 7:13); the marginal reading “love apples” is due to the supposed connection of [dudha’im] with דּוֹדִים‎ [dodhim], “love”): Mandrakes are the fruit of the Mandragora officinarum, a member of the Solanaceae
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