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Malice
Despite • Despiteful • Malignity • Vindictive
Dictionaries
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Malice
Malice [Heb. raʿ (Ps. 41:5 [MT 6]; 73:8, šeʾāṭ (Ezk. 25:6, 15); Gk. ponēría (MT 22:11), kakía (Rom. 1:29; 1 Cor 5:8; Eph. 4:31; Col. 3:8; Tit. 3:3; 1 Pet 2:1)]; AV also EVIL, WICKEDLY, WICKEDNESS, DESPITE (FUL); NEB also “desperate” (Ps. 41:5), SCORN, MALICIOUS, CORRUPTION, BAD FEELING; MALICIOUS
Despite
Despite Archaic in the AV for “contempt,” as in Ezk. 25:6, 15; 36:5 (Heb. še’āṭ, RSV “malice,” “utter contempt”); Mt. 5:44; Lk. 6:28 (“use despitefully,” Gk. epēreázō, RSV “abuse”); Acts 14:5 (“use despitefully,” hybrízō, RSV “molest”); Rom. 1:30 (“despiteful,” hybristḗs, RSV “insolent”);
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Malice
MALICE, MALICIOUSNESS. These words, representing “the very essence of badness lying in the heart” (Crabb), are the translations of Gr. kakia (Rom 1:29; 1 Cor 5:8; 14:20; Eph 4:31; Col 3:8; Tit 3:3; 1 Pet 2:1, 16) and of ponēria (Mt 22:18, RSV). The expression “malicious [ponērois] words” occurs in
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Malice
MALICE. In the NT this translates Gk. kakia, which has the following meanings: 1. ‘Wickedness’, ‘evil’ (1 Cor. 14:20; Jas. 1:21; 1 Pet. 2:1, 16; and also in Acts 8:22, of an individual sinful act). ‘Malice’ in 17th-century (av) English had primarily this meaning. 2. ‘Ill-will’, ‘spitefulness’; i.e. ‘malice’
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Malice
MALICE (Gk. kakia, “badness,” 1 Cor. 5:8; Eph. 4:31; Col. 3:8; Titus 3:3; 1 Pet. 2:1). This Gk. word denotes a vicious disposition, evilness, or wickedness. A kindred word is in Rom. 1:29 (Gk. kakoētheia, “bad character”), given by Paul in his long list of Gentile sins and implying malignant subtlety
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Malice
MALICE — a vicious intention, or a desire of one person to hurt another (Titus 3:3). Malice is often irrational, usually based on the false belief that the person against whom it is directed has the same intention. It is contrary to love (1 Cor. 13:4–7). Christians are instructed to rid their lives of
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
MALICE, MALIGNITY
MALICE, MALIGNITY<mal’-is>, <ma-lig’-ni-ti> ([κακία, kakia], [πονηρός, poneros], [κακοήθεια, kakoetheia]): “Malice,” now used in the sense of deliberate ill-will, by its derivation means badness, or wickedness generally, and was so used in Older English. In the Apocrypha it is the translation of
DESPITE; DESPITEFUL
DESPITE; DESPITEFUL<de-spit’>, <de-spit’-fool>: “Despite” is from Latin despectus, “a looking down upon.” As a noun (= “contempt”) it is now generally used in its shortened form, “spite,” while the longer form is used as a preposition (= “in spite of”). In English Versions of the Bible it
Pocket Dictionary of Ethics
Malice
malice. A disposition consisting of the desire to inflict injury or *suffering on another person. Malice may take the form of simply gloating over another’s misfortune, or it can come to be expressed as an actual act of violence directed against the other person.
Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Malice
MALICE Vicious intention; desire to hurt someone. Malice is characteristic of preconversion life in opposition to God (Rom. 1:29; Titus 3:3). Christians are frequently called upon to rid their lives of malice (Eph. 4:31–32; Col. 3:8; 1 Pet. 2:1).
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Malice, Malignity
MALICE, malʹis, MALIGNITY, ma-ligʹni-ti (κακία, kakía, πονηρός, ponērós, κακοήθεια, kakoḗtheia): “Malice,” now used in the sense of deliberate ill-will, by its derivation means badness, or wickedness generally, and was so used in Older Eng. In the Apoc it is the tr of kakia, “evil,” “badness” (Wisd
Despite, Despiteful
DESPITE, dē-spītʹ, DESPITEFUL, dē̇-spītʹfŏŏl “Despite” is from Lat despectus, “a looking down upon.” As a noun (= “contempt”) it is now generally used in its shortened form, “spite,” while the longer form is used as a prep. (= “in spite of”). In EV it is always a noun. In the OT it translates Heb