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Magistrate
Magistrates • Praetor • Sheriff • Sheriffs
Dictionaries
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Magistrate
Magistrate. Title of a public official who acted as judge and administrator of a given municipality. King Artaxerxes ordered Ezra to select magistrates along with judges to govern the people when they returned to Palestine (Ezr 7:25). This official was one of the officers of Nebuchadnezzar’s court invited
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Magistrate
Magistrate [Aram šāp̱ēṭ] (Ezr. 7:25); NEB ARBITRATORS; [pl of tip̱tāy] (Dnl. 3:2f); AV SHERIFFS; NEB CHIEF CONSTABLES; [Gk. árchōn] (Lk. 12:58); NEB COURT; [pl of stratēgós] (Acts 16:20, 22, 35f, 38). The term is used for a variety of officials whose functions, while not precisely known, are
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Magistrate
MAGISTRATE Title of a public official who acted as judge and administrator of a given municipality. King Artaxerxes ordered Ezra to select magistrates along with judges to govern the people when they returned to Palestine (Ezr 7:25). This official was one of the officers of Nebuchadnezzar’s court invited
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Magistrate
magistrate, an official who exercised certain administrative functions in cities of the Roman Empire. Magistrates were elected annually and were typically the highest state officials in an individual city or town. They were responsible for maintenance of public works and the preservation of civil order.
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Magistrate
MAGISTRATE. The rendering of a variety of Heb. and Gr. terms in the KJV which refer to a public and civil official.Behind its use in Jdg 18:7 stands a somewhat obscure phrase probably meaning “possessing authority” (ASV). In Ezr 7:25 “magistrates” also RSV translates a word (shāptı̂n) normally rendered
Sheriff
SHERIFF. One of the offices represented in the distinguished group which Nebuchadnezzar had assembled for the dedication of his golden image (Dan 3:2). The RSV and NASB render the Aramaic term by “magistrates.”
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Magistrate
MAGISTRATE. In Ezr. 7:25 ‘magistrate’ translates the Heb. šôp̄ēṭ, ‘judge’. In Jdg. 18:7, av ‘there was no magistrate in the land’ is a paraphrase of the Heb, idiom yāraš ‘eṣer, ‘to possess restraint’ (rsv ‘lacking nothing’). Dn 3:2–3 lists magistrates (Aram. tip̱tāye’, av ‘sheriffs’) among officials
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Magistrate
MagistrateA judicial official who implemented the Torah as the official law for the Jews (Aram. šāp̱ṭɩ̂n; Ezra 7:25). In the NT the term refers to Roman rulers (Gk. archḗ, árchōn; Luke 12:11, 58; Tit. 3:1) who were annually elected and were the highest state officials of Roman colonies and towns
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Magistrate
Magistrate. †A judicial official, or a government official of wider responsibilities viewed in relation to his judicial function. The highest officials in Roman colonies such as Philippi were called in Latin duumviri or (an older term) praetores. The usual Greek equivalent was stratēgoí “magistrates,”
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Magistrate
MAGISTRATE. The rendering of several Heb. and Gk. words, and referring to a public civil officer. Among the Hebrews, Greeks, and Romans the corresponding term had a much wider signification than the term magistrate with us.1. “Magistrates and judges” (Ezra 7:25) ought to be rendered “judges and rulers.”
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Magistrate
Magistratea public civil officer invested with authority. The Hebrew shophetim, or judges, were magistrates having authority in the land (Deut. 1:16, 17). In Judg. 18:7 the word “magistrate” (A.V.) is rendered in the Revised Version “possessing authority”, i.e., having power to do them harm by invasion.
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Magistrate
Magistratemagistrate, an official who exercised ordinary administration of the Roman Empire’s cities. Magistrates quieted sedition (Luke 12:11), settled property disputes (Acts 16:20–22) and debts (Luke 12:58), and policed and jailed felons (Acts 16:35–38).
Praetor
Praetorpraetor (prayʹtohr), a senior Roman magistrate of senatorial rank. Praetors served as judges, commanders in the army, managers of the senate treasury, supervisors of the roads, of grain distribution, or of public works, or as governors of provinces. A person was eligible for praetorship at age
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
MAGISTRATE
MAGISTRATE<maj’-is-trat> (שְׁפַט‎ [shephaT], corresponding to שָׁפַט‎ [shaphaT], “to judge,” “to pronounce sentence” (Jdg 18:7)): Among the ancients, the terms corresponding to our “magistrate” had a much wider signification. “Magistrates and judges” (וַדַיָּנִים‎ [shopheTim we-dhayyanim]) should
SHERIFF
SHERIFF<sher’-if> (Aramaic [תִּפְתָּיֵא‎, tiphtaye’] “judicial,” “a lawyer,” “a sheriff” (Daniel 3:2 f]): Probably a “lawyer” or “jurist” whose business it was to decide points of law. At best, however, the translation “sheriff” is but a conjecture.