Loading…
Lysias
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A Seleucid nobleman who was entrusted by Antiochus Epiphanes with ruling the eastern part of the empire (from the Euphrates in the north to the border with Egypt in the south) and caring for his son, Antiochus V Eupator, while Antiochus Epiphanes traveled to Persia to collect revenue to fund his attempt to put down the Maccabean revolt (1 Macc 3:27–33; 2 Macc 10:11; 11:1). Lysias was given half of the Seleucid army and instructed to subdue Judaea while Antiochus was gone (1 Macc 3:34–36). However, Lysias was unable to defeat the Maccabees (1 Macc 4:34–35; 6:5–7). The account in 2 Macc depicts Lysias (with the blessing of Antiochus Epiphanes) making peace with the Jews after realizing he could not defeat them because “the mighty God fought on their side” (2 Macc 11:13; see 2 Macc 11:13–33).
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Lysias
Lysias (Λυσίας, Lysias). A Seleucid nobleman who was entrusted by Antiochus Epiphanes with ruling the eastern part of the empire (from the Euphrates in the north to the border with Egypt in the south) and caring for his son, Antiochus V Eupator, while Antiochus Epiphanes traveled to Persia to collect
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Lysias (Person)
LYSIAS (PERSON) [Gk Lysias (Λυσιας)]. 1. See CLAUDIUS LYSIAS.2. A Syrian of royal lineage appointed regent of the area from the Euphrates to the Egyptian border by Antiochus IV Epiphanes, when Antiochus raided Persia for money ca. 165 b.c.e. (1 Macc 3:33). He was also made guardian of the king’s son,
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Lysias
LYSIAS1. Roman commander who wrote a letter to Felix concerning the apostle Paul (Acts 23:26). See Claudius Lysias.2. Appointed regent of Syria by Antiochus IV Epiphanes while the king was fighting the Parthians (1 Macc 3:31–37; 166–165 bc). Lysias (d. 162 bc) sent generals Ptolemy, Nicanor, and Gorgias
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Lysias
Mound of Lystra. Robert CooleyLYSIAS a Roman officer in Jerusalem at the time of Paul’s arrest. He is called “the chief captain” (Acts 21:31–33, 37), or “military tribune” (ASV marg.). The Gr. word chiliarchos is, literally, “a ruler of a thousand,” thus he commanded a cohort (about 1,000 men).His
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Lysias
Lysias (Gk. Lysɩ́as)A general in the Seleucid army of Antiochus IV. When Antiochus went to Persia to raise funds, he left orders for Lysias to march against Jerusalem (1 Macc. 3:32–41). In 165 b.c.e. Lysias’ commanders met defeat at Emmaus in a battle with Judas Maccabeus (1 Macc. 4:1–24). Lysias marched
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Lysias
Lys´ias (dissolving), a nobleman of the blood-royal, 1 Macc. 3:32; 2 Macc. 11:1, who was entrusted by Antiochus Epiphanes (cir. b.c. 166) with the government of southern Syria and the guardianship of his son Antiochus Eupator. 1 Macc. 3:32; 2 Macc. 10:11. After the death of Antiochus Epiphanes, b.c.
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Lysias
LYS´IAS (lisʹĭ-as).1. Claudius, the “commander” of the Roman troops in Jerusalem who rescued Paul from the fury of the Jews (cf. Acts 22:24–30) and sent him under guard to the procurator Felix at Caesarea (23:17–30; 24:7, 22), a.d. 55.2. A general under Antiochus Epiphanes and Antiochus Eupator (1
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
LYSIAS
LYSIAS<lis’-i-as> ([Λυσίας, Lusias]):1. “A noble man, and one of the blood royal” whom Antiochus Epiphanes (circa 166 BC) left with the government of Southern Syria and the guardianship of his son, while he went in person into Persia to collect the revenues which were. not coming in satisfactorily
The Westminster Bible Dictionary
Lysias
Lysʹi-as, Clauʹdi-us, the “chief captain” who commanded the Roman troops in Jerusalem during the latter part of the procuratorship of Felix. He rescued Paul from the infuriated Jews and sent him under guard to Felix at Cæsarea (Acts 21:31–38; 22:24–30; 23:17–30; 24:7–22). Nothing more is known of him
Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, Volumes I–III
LYSIAS
LY′SIAS (Λυσίας). 1. An Athenian, who, according to Diodorus (xiii. 74), was one of the ten generals appointed to succeed Alcibiades in the command of the fleet, b. c. 406. His name indeed does not occur in the list of them as given by Xenophon (Hell. i. 5. § 16), but that author agrees with Diodorus
See also