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Lydia (region)
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A territory in western Asia Minor along the Hermus River (known in Turkish as the Gediz River). Figures significantly in the book of Acts; several of the churches of Revelation were in this territory.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Lydia
Lydia, Region (Λυδία, Lydia). A territory in western Asia Minor along the Hermus River (known in Turkish as the Gediz River). Figures significantly in the book of Acts; several of the churches of Revelation were in this territory.
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Lydia (Place)
LYDIA (PLACE) [Gk Lydia (Λυδια)]. The region in W Asia Minor to which Paul and Silas proceed after their release from the Philippian jail in Acts 16:40.A. GeographyB. History1. Prehistory2. Lydian Kingdom3. Persian Period4. Hellenistic and Roman PeriodsC. LanguageD. ReligionE. Material Culture
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Lydia (Place)
Lydia (Place). Name designating a geographical area occurring only in 1 Maccabees 8:8, where it refers to a province in western Asia Minor (modern Turkey) bounded on the north by Mysia, on the east by Phrygia, on the south by Caria, and on the west by the Greek cities of Ionia. It is listed among the
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Lydia
Lydia liʹēə [Gk. Lydia]. A region in the western part of Asia Minor, bounded on the north by Mysia, on the east by Phrygia, on the south by Caria, and on the west by the Aegean Sea. The western third of Asia Minor (W of 31 degrees East Longitude) is a mountainous region cut by numerous river valleys.
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Lydia (Place)
LYDIA (Place) Name designating a geographical area occurring in Jeremiah 46:9, Ezekiel 27:10, and 30:5 in the nlt. In other versions, it is listed as “Lud” (see nlt mg) or “Ludim.” But the identification of Lydia with Lud or Ludim in the OT is not certain. Jeremiah mentions Lud in connection with the
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Lydia
Lydia (lid´ee-uh).1 An area in south-central Asia Minor, whose most famous king was Croesus (sixth century bce). Successively occupied by the Persians, Alexander the Great, and his successors, the Romans finally incorporated Lydia into the province of Asia. It is mentioned in 1 Macc. 8:8. Thyatira,
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Lydia
LYDIA, a district in the centre of the W slope of Asia Minor, included the Caÿster and Hermus valleys, the most fertile and highly cultivated areas of the peninsula, and between them the mountains of Tmolus, rising to 2,000 m. Besides its natural wealth its position on the main routes from the coast
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Lydia
Lydia (Gk. Lydɩ́a) (PLACE)A prosperous commercial center in western Asia Minor on the Aegean Sea, a producer of textiles and purple dye (Strabo Geog. 13.4.14). According to Herodotus, the Lydian king Croesus, whose wealth and power were legendary (Hist. 1.28), allied himself with the Egyptians and Babylonians
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Lydia (Place)
LYDIA [lĭdˊĭ ə] (Gk. Lydia) (PLACE).† A region and country in southwestern Asia Minor, named after its Iron Age inhabitants, the Lydians (Gk. Ludoi), an apparently Indoeuropean people perhaps related to the Luwians. The territory was bounded on the north by Mysia, on the east by Phrygia, and
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Lydia
Lyd´ia (land of Lydus), a maritime province in the west of Asia Minor, bounded by Mysia on the north, Phrygia on the east, and Caria on the south. It is enumerated among the districts which the Romans took away from Antiochus the Great after the battle of Magnesia in b.c. 190, and transferred to Eumenus
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Lydia
Lydia(1.) Ezek. 30:5 (Heb. Lud), a province in the west of Asia Minor, which derived its name from the fourth son of Shem (Gen. 10:22). It was bounded on the east by the greater Phrygia, and on the west by Ionia and the AEgean Sea.(2.) A woman of Thyatira, a “seller of purple,” who dwelt in Philippi
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Lydia
LydiaLydia (lidʹee-uh). 1 An area in south-central Asia Minor, whose most famous king was Croesus (sixth century b.c.). Successively occupied by the Persians, Alexander the Great and his successors, and the Romans who incorporated it into the province of Asia, it is mentioned in 1 Macc. 8:8. Thyatira,