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Lord’s Prayer
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Lord’s Prayer
Lord’s Prayer Jesus’ model of prayer given to the disciples in Matt 6:9–13 and Luke 11:2–4. A succinct and powerful expression of how to pray in light of the gospel and the kingdom of God. Didache 8:2 records a nearly identical prayer, demonstrating its early adoption in the Church.
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Lord’s Prayer
LORD’S PRAYER. The modern name for the prayer uttered by Jesus as recorded in Matt 6:9–13 and Luke 11:2–4. The Matthean form of the prayer is reproduced in the Didache (8:2), and faint echoes of its language can be detected in the prayer of Jesus in John 17.A. Issues in Interpretation1. Original Version
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Lord’s Prayer
Lord’s Prayer. Pattern for prayer Jesus gave his followers to use. There are two versions of the Lord’s Prayer (Mt 6:9–13; Lk 11:2–4). The former is included in the Sermon on the Mount; the latter is Jesus’ response to a disciple’s request that he teach them to pray. There are considerable differences
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Lord’s Prayer
Lord’s PrayerThe prayer that Jesus taught His disciples as a model. It occurs in two forms; one in Mt. 6:9–13, the other in Lk. 11:2–4. I. ContextA. MatthewB. Luke II. ContentA. AddressB. “Thou” PetitionsC. “We” PetitionsD. Doxology III. Critical IssuesA. TextB. Tradition History IV. Jewish
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Lord’s Prayer, the
LORD’S PRAYER, THE* Pattern for prayer Jesus gave his followers to use. There are two versions of the Lord’s Prayer (Mt 6:9–13; Lk 11:2–4). The former is included in the Sermon on the Mount; the latter is Jesus’ response to a disciple’s request that he teach them to pray. There are considerable differences
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Lord’s Prayer
Lord’s Prayer, a prayer given by Jesus to his followers. It is found in different versions in Matt. 6:9–13 and Luke 11:2–4. The version in Matthew is longer, consisting of an address and seven petitions. In Luke, it consists of an address and only five petitions.In Matthew, the Lord’s Prayer is embedded
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Lord's Prayer
LORD’S PRAYER. This occurs in a longer (Mt 6:9–13) and a shorter (Lk 11:2–4) form in the NT, each evangelist having recorded that form which was currently used in worship in the church center from which he wrote. The essential elements of the prayer occur in both forms. The differences between the two
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Lord’s Prayer, the
LORD’S PRAYER, THE. The prayer which our Lord taught his disciples as the model prayer for their regular use. In Mt. 6:9–13 it is given as an integral part of the Sermon on the Mount. But in Lk. 11:2–4 it is given by our Lord in different circumstances. It is probable that since he meant this prayer
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Lord’s Prayer
Lord’s PrayerThe prayer attributed to Jesus in Matt. 6:9–13; Luke 11:2–4. The prayer appears in two different forms. Matthew’s opening invocation (“Our Father who is in the heavens”) is longer than Luke’s single word address “Father.” While both versions share the next two petitions (“May your name
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Lord’s Prayer
Lord’s Prayer. †The prayer taught by Jesus to his disciples (Matt. 6:9–13; Luke 11:2–4; Did. 8.2 [perhaps based on Matthew]). The address is followed first by petitions relating to God’s name, kingdom, and will, and then by petitions relating to the physical and spiritual needs of those praying.
Pater Noster
Pater Noster [pătˊər nŏsˊtər] (Lat. “Our Father”). The opening words of the Lord’s Prayer as translated by Jerome in the Vulgate, adopted by Roman Catholics as the prayer’s title. In English the prayer is often called the “Our Father.” See Lord’s Prayer.
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Lord’s Prayer
LORD’S PRAYER The prayer Jesus taught his disciples in Matt 6:9–15 and Luke 11:2–4. It is the only preformulated prayer attributed to him in the New Testament. It is also called the Our Father, from its first two words.Matthew’s version of the prayer (which is followed in the Didache, 8:2) is part of
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Lord’s Prayer
Lord’s Prayer (Lat. Oratio Dominica or Pater Noster), the prayer, ‘Our Father’, taught by the Lord to His disciples. In the NT it is given in two slightly different forms: in Mt. 6:9–13, in the teaching on prayer in the *Sermon on the Mount, and in Lk. 11:2–4, where Christ gives it in answer to the
Key passages
Mt 6:9–13

Therefore you pray in this way: “Our Father who is in heaven, may your name be treated as holy. May your kingdom come, may your will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us today our daily bread, and forgive us our debts, as we also have forgiven our debtors. And do not bring …

Lk 11:2–4

And he said to them, “When you pray, say, “Father, may your name be treated as holy. May your kingdom come. Give us each day our daily bread. And forgive us our sins, for we ourselves also forgive everyone who is indebted to us. And do not lead us into temptation.”

See also