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Logia
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
The plural form of the Greek word “logion,” a diminutive of “logos.” Often used in biblical scholarship to denote divine communication or to refer to a hypothetical collection of sayings that influenced the writers of the New Testament Gospels.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Logia
Logia (Λόγια, Logia). The plural form of the Greek word “logion,” a diminutive of “logos.” Often used in biblical scholarship to denote divine communication or to refer to a hypothetical collection of sayings that influenced the writers of the New Testament Gospels.
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Logia
LOGIA. Logia is a loan word from Greek (pl. of logion, a diminutive of logos, or “word”) meaning “oracles” or “sayings.” Among ancient Christian writers the term is employed in a variety of ways, referring to sayings of Jesus (e.g., Pol. Phil. 7:1; Eus., Hist. Eccl. 9.7.15), but also to accounts of things
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Logia
LOGIA* Term used for many of Jesus’ sayings as collected and later employed by the Gospel writers. See Jesus Christ, Life and Teachings of.
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Logia
LogiaA saying, often short, generally associated with deity. In Classical Greek lógia was nearly equivalent to chrēsmós, “oracular saying.” In the LXX it is usually used to translate Heb. ʾōmer and ʾimrâ but is also used for dāḇār instead of the usual lógos (“word”). Usages of lógion and lógia
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Logia
Logia [lōˊjē ə, lōgˊē ə] (Gk. lógia “sayings” or “pronouncements”).† A technical term for the sacred utterances of deities. The term has been applied in technical usage to the sayings of Jesus, especially collections found in papyri fragments that may have been used by the writers of the Gospels.
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
logia
logia (Gk. λόγια, ‘sayings’). In NT criticism the term is applied to a supposed collection of the sayings of Christ which circulated in the early Church. The use of the word in this connection derives from the statement of *Papias that ‘Matthew compiled the logia (τὰ λόγια) in the Hebrew language,
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Logia
LOGIA — a term applied to collections of sayings credited to Jesus and used as source materials by the gospel writers in the writing of their gospels. The Greek word logia literally means “oracles, divine responses, utterances, or sayings.” Some scholars see many similarities between the Gospel of Matthew
Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Logia
LOGIA (Lō gēʹ ȧ) Greek term applied to a collection of sayings. It comes from the same root as logos, a Greek word usually translated “word” (John 1:1, 14). The Church Fathers used “logia” to denote a collection of the sayings of Jesus. In his History of the Church, Eusebius (ca. a.d. 260 to ca. 340)
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 3, H–L
Logia
logia loh’jee-ah. The Greek term logia (pl. of logion G3359) is used in nonbiblical literature for the utterances of deities. Such usage is also found in the Septuagint (e.g., Ps. 12:6 [Heb. 12:7, lxx 11:7] for Heb. ʾimrâ H614) and occasionally in the NT (Acts 7:38; Rom. 3:2; cf. Heb. 5:13; 1 Pet. 4:11).