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Liver
Body and body parts
Dictionaries
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Liver
Liver. Large abdominal organ that performs many functions necessary for life. The writer of Proverbs understood the critical nature of the liver when he noted that a dart injury to the liver (rsv entrails) was fatal (Prv 7:23). In most instances in Scripture the liver is mentioned in connection with
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Liver
Liver[Heb kāḇēḏ] (Ex. 29:13, 22; Lev. 3:4, 10, 15, etc.]. As the heftiest of the internal body glands, the liver apparently came to its name quite naturally from the verbal root kbd, “be heavy” (cf. other Semitic cognates for liver; Ugar. kbd, Akk. kabittu, and Aram kaḇdāʾ).In eleven of the twelve
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Liver
LIVER Large abdominal organ that performs many functions necessary for life. The writer of Proverbs understood the critical nature of the liver when he noted that an arrow injury to the liver (nlt “heart”) was fatal (Prv 7:23). In most instances, in Scripture the liver is mentioned in connection with
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Liver
LIVER. The Heb. word kābēd basically means “heavy,” and thus the liver was considered the heavy organ par excellence of the body. Piercing the liver of a man by an arrow was considered fatal (Prov 7:23). An animal’s liver was an important part of the sacrificial offering (Ex 29:13, 22; Lev 3:4, 10,
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Liver
LIVER. Only in the OT does this word occur. The Heb. kāḇēḏ is from a root meaning ‘to be heavy’, or by extension of meaning ‘to be honoured’. So, it is the heavy organ. Of the 14 occurrences, 11 are in Ex. and Lv., referring to the liver of a sacrificial beast.The ‘appendage (av ‘caul’) of the liver’ (Ex.
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Liver
LiverThe largest and heaviest organ in animal and human bodies. The Hebrew term (kāḇēḏ) apparently derives from the common Semitic root kbd, “to be heavy,” and can refer to a physical organ or to the depths of one’s being.In all but one OT occurrence the term concerns an animal. The lobe or appendage
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Liver
Liver (Heb. kāḇēḏ).† The largest gland in vertebrates, which secretes bile. In sacrifices the “appendage of the liver” (RSV; KJV “caul above the liver”), i.e., the caudate lobe of the liver that is usually prominent in sheep, was set apart with the kidneys and sometimes other parts as a separate
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Liver
LIVER (Heb. kābēd, “heavy, weighty,” as the “heaviest” of the internal organs). The word often occurs in the natural sense, as indicative of a vital organ in the animal system, especially with reference to the part of animals slain in sacrifice (“the lobe of the liver,” Ex. 29:13, 22; Lev. 3:4, 10,
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Liver
Liver(Heb. kabhed, “heavy;” hence the liver, as being the heaviest of the viscera, Ex. 29:13, 22; Lev. 3:4, 1, 10, 15) was burnt upon the altar, and not used as sacrificial food. In Ezek. 21:21 there is allusion, in the statement that the king of Babylon “looked upon the liver,” to one of the most ancient
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Liver
LIVER — an organ in the body that aids in digestion. The liver is referred to most often in connection with animal sacrifice. The “fatty lobe attached to the liver” (Ex. 29:13) was burned on the altar along with the kidneys and inner fat.
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
LIVER
LIVER<liv’-er> (כָּבֵד‎ [qabhedh], derived from a root meaning “to be heavy,” being the heaviest of the viscera; Septuagint [ηπαρ, hepar]): The word is usually joined with the Hebrew [yothereth] (see CAUL) (Ex 29:13, 22; Lev 9:10, 19) as a special portion set aside for the burnt offering.
The Westminster Bible Dictionary
Liver
Livʹer, an important organ in the animal body, so called as being the heaviest of the viscera or as the chief seat of the passions. It is frequently mentioned in Scripture (Ex. 29:13, 22; Lev. 3:4, 10, 15; Prov. 7:23; Ezek. 21:21). It was supposed by the ancients to be the seat of the passions pride,