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Lift
Hoise
Dictionaries
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Lift
LiftA common English verb meaning to Raise or elevate, used by the RSV to translate a great variety of Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek terms. In the OT it most often represents Heb. nāśāʾ, a very common verb meaning “raise, lift up,” “support,” “carry,” or “exalt.” Other OT terms include Heb. rûm (qal,
Hoise
HoiseAn archaic form of “hoist,” used by the AV in Acts 27:40 to translate Gk. epaírō, “lift up.”
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Lift
LIFT. The English translation of 16 or more Heb. roots and of six Gr. roots. It is exclusively the rendering of verb forms, never of nouns. It therefore conveys the idea of raising or elevating action. It is used with respect to many situations, either literally or figuratively.The verb translated most
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Lift
LIFT (Heb. nāśā˒ Gk. airō). Besides the general meaning of raising, this word has figurative meanings:1. To lift up the hands is, among the orientals, a common part of taking an oath (Gen. 14:22; Ex. 6:8, see marg.). To lift up one’s hand against another is to attack, to fight him (2 Sam. 18:28;
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
LIFT
LIFTTo make lofty, to raise up. A very common word in English Versions of the Bible representing a great variety of Hebrew and Greek words, although in the Old Testament used chiefly as the translation of נָשָׂא‎ [nasa’]. Of none of these words, however, is “lift” used as a technical translation,
HOISE
HOISE<hoiz>: The older form of “hoist” (Old English, hoise), to raise, to lift, and is the translation of epairo, “to lift up”: “they .... hoised up the mainsail to the wind” (Acts 27:40). the Revised Version (British and American) “and hoisting up the foresail to the wind”; Wycliff has “lefte
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Lift
LIFT: To make lofty, to raise up. A very common word in EV representing a great variety of Heb and Gr words, although in the OT used chiefly as the tr of נָשָׂא‎, nāsā’. Of none of these words, however, is “lift” used as a technical tr, and “lift” is interchanged freely with its synonyms, esp. “exalt” (cf
Hoise
HOISE, hoiz: The older form of “hoist” (OE hoise), to raise, to lift, and is the tr of epaírō, “to lift up”: “they.… hoised up the mainsail to the wind” (Acts 27:40). RV “and hoisting up the foresail to the wind”; Wiclif has “lefte up,” Tindale “hoysed up.”
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
LIFT, TO
LIFT, TO OR TO BEAR [מָשַׁךְmashak, נָשָׂאnasaʾ, עָלָהʿalah, קוּםqum, רוּםrum; ἐγείρω egeirō, ἐπαίρω epairō, ὑπολαμβάνω hypolambano, ὑψόω hypsoō]. Although there are abundant biblical examples of lifting and bearing objects in all the usual senses, there are several particular applications