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Letter of Tattenai
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
Also spelled Tatnai. A Persian official who at first protested the rebuilding of Jerusalem, but eventually assisted in the project under the command of Darius (Ezra 5:3, 6; 6:6, 13). Tattenai’s title, sometimes translated “governor,” is the same one given to Nehemiah (Neh 5:14) and Zerubbabel (Hag 1:1).
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Tattenai
Tattenai (תַּתְּנַי‎, tattenay). Also spelled Tatnai. A Persian official who at first protested the rebuilding of Jerusalem, but eventually assisted in the project under the command of Darius (Ezra 5:3, 6; 6:6, 13). Tattenai’s title, sometimes translated “governor,” is the same one given to Nehemiah (Neh
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Tattenai (Person)
TATTENAI (PERSON) [Aram tattĕnay (תַּתְּנַי)]. Var. SISINNES. Persian governor of the province Beyond the River during the reign of Darius I (ruled 521–486 b.c.e.) who sent a letter to inform the king of building activity in Jerusalem (Ezra 5:3, 6; 6:6, 13 = 1 Esdras 6:3, 7, 27, and 7:1). Tattenai is
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Tattenai, Tatnai
Tattenai, Tatnai. Persian governor of a province west of the Euphrates River, who opposed the rebuilding of the Jerusalem temple and walls under Zerubbabel during the postexilic period (Ezr 5:3, 6; 6:6, 13, kjv Tatnai).
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Tattenai
Tattenai tat̀ə-nī [Aram tattenay; Gk. Apoc. Sisinnēs] (Ezr. 5:3, 6; 6:6, 13; 1 Esd. 6:3; 7:1); AV TATNAI. The Persian governor of the province “Beyond the River” (Aram ʿaḇar-naha) who followed Rehum and ruled during the reign of Darius I (521–486 b.c.).Earlier attempts to identify Tattenai
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Tattenai
TATTENAI Persian governor of a province west of the Euphrates River who opposed the rebuilding of the Jerusalem temple and walls under Zerubbabel during the postexilic period (Ezr 5:3, 6; 6:6, 13).
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Tattenai
Tattenai (tat´uh-ni), the governor of the Persian province called Beyond the River (Ezra 5:3, 6). In postexilic times, this province included Samaria and Judea, and so the rebuilding of the Jerusalem temple at the time of Zerubbabel came to Tattenai’s attention. He checked into the situation and reported
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Tatnai
TATNAI. The Persian governor of the district of Samaria, who stopped the rebuilding of the temple under Zerubbabel (Ezr 5:3, 6) until he had the matter of Cyrus’ permission to the Jews investigated in the archives of Darius (Ezr 6:6–13). He was identified with the satrap over Babylon an Trans-Euphratia,
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Tattenai
TATTENAI (Heb. tattenai; av ‘Tatnai’; cf. Gk. Sisinnes, 1 Esdras 6:3; 7:1, rsv). The Persian governor, successor of Rehum, of the Samaria district during the reign of Darius Hystaspes and Zerubbabel (Ezr. 5:3, 6; 6:6, 13). He investigated and reported in a sympathetic manner on complaints made from Jerusalem
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Tattenai
Tattenai (Aram. tattĕnay)The Persian governor of the province Beyond the River (Ezra 5:3, 6; 6:6, 13). He informed King Darius I Hystaspes concerning the reconstruction of Jerusalem (ca. 520 b.c.e.) and was instructed not to hamper this work.
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Tattenai
Tattenai [tătˊə nī] (Aram. tattenay). The Persian governor of the province Beyond the River (Ezra 5:3, 6; 6:6, 13; KJV “Tatnai”). When Tattenai asked King Dariusl Hystaspes for more information concerning the reconstruction of Jerusalem (ca. 520 B.C.), the king told him not to prevent this work.
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Tattenai
TATTENAI The governor of the Persian province or satrapy called “Beyond the River,” which was made up of the lands west of the Euphrates, including Syria, Palestine, and Phoenicia. Tattenai appears in Ezra when he inquired of the Persian king Darius I whether it was lawful for the Jews to rebuild the
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Tatna-i
Tat´na-i (gift), satrap of the province west of the Euphrates in the time of Darius Hystaspes. Ezra 5:3, 6; 6:6, 13. (b.c. 520.) The name is thought to be Persian.
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